Over 43.5 million U.S. adults provide an average of 19 hours per week of informal caregiving to loved ones aged 50 and older. At the end of caregiving, the loved one's death thrusts the caregiver into a critical transition where, although life is no longer filled with unremitting care, the emotional impact of caregiving, characterized by chaos, conflicts, role stress, and strain, may continue. The purpose of this proposed study is to address a critical barrier to understanding the post-caregiving period in African-American families after the death of an older family member, an area about which little is known. Responding to NINR's Area of Research Emphasis: Caregiving, and using Transition Theory, we will describe the types, patterns, and properties of the post-caregiving transition (PCT);explore the facilitators and inhibitors of PCT progress;and describe the process and outcome indicators of the PCT in 40 African American post-caregivers (AAPCGs). The proposed mixed method, inductive, case-oriented, qualitative descriptive design will expand the body of knowledge about AAPCGs, taking culture into account. Embedded in this predominantly qualitative design will be a supplementary variable-oriented component using standardized instruments to determine levels of caregiver support, depression, and adjustment. Variable-oriented analyses will be used for purposes of fuller description, rather than to draw statistical inferences. Case- and variable-oriented data will be integrated at the level of analysis and interpretation, comparing data within and across cases and contributing to nursing science through increased understanding of the PCT in AAPCGs. The ultimate goal of this proposed research is to build the science by creating a comprehensive, detailed description of the PCT in AAPCGs as the first step in designing client-centered nursing interventions that help incorporate the caregiving experience into new identities in the PCT. During the NRSA Fellowship period, the applicant will maintain attendance at regular doctoral seminars designed to enhance research skills, especially in the area of methodology, data collection and analyses, and scientific integrity and ethical conduct of research. She also will benefit from the monthly meetings at the Hartford Center for Improving Health Outcomes in Aging. As a Jonas Scholar, Ms. Ume will attend Gerontological Society of America conferences and participate in Interest Group Meetings on minority and caregiving issues to enhance her knowledge and to allow for collegial networking with other researchers, and participate in the conference for Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity. She will work collaboratively and intensively with her sponsor and co-sponsor to tailor specific experiences to the individual NRSA training plan;enhance her skills in caregiving research;and implement her proposed study on AAPCGs, including all aspects of data collection, analysis and interpretation and integration of qualitative with quantitative data, should she be funded.

Public Health Relevance

The purpose of this proposed study is to address a critical barrier to understanding the post-caregiving period in African-American families after the death of an older family member, an area about which little is known. Responding to NINR's Area of Research Emphasis: Caregiving, and using Transition Theory, we will describe the types, patterns, and properties of the post-caregiving transition (PCT);explore the facilitators and inhibitors of PCT progress;and describe the process and outcome indicators of the PCT in 40 African American post-caregivers. The ultimate goal of this proposed research is to build the science by creating a comprehensive, detailed description of the PCT in African American post-caregivers as the first step in designing client-centered nursing interventions that help incorporate caregiving experiences into new identities in the post-caregiving transition.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)
Type
Predoctoral Individual National Research Service Award (F31)
Project #
5F31NR013117-02
Application #
8318339
Study Section
National Institute of Nursing Research Initial Review Group (NRRC)
Program Officer
Aziz, Noreen M
Project Start
2011-08-15
Project End
2013-08-14
Budget Start
2012-08-15
Budget End
2013-08-14
Support Year
2
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$38,577
Indirect Cost
Name
Arizona State University-Tempe Campus
Department
None
Type
Schools of Nursing
DUNS #
943360412
City
Tempe
State
AZ
Country
United States
Zip Code
85287