Participation in cancer clinical trials is an effective means of reducing cancer disparities among Black cancer patients because they provide an opportunity to receive high quality health care from leading healthcare providers and researchers. Much of the research about cancer clinical trial participation among Blacks involves members of the Black community who do not have cancer, or who are not cancer survivors. It is not known what factors actually influence Black cancer patients to participate and remain in cancer clinical trials. Moreover, we do not know the day-to-day experiences of Black adults with cancer as they navigate their way through the clinical trial process. This application proposes a qualitative descriptive study using face-to-face and real-time telephone interviews to identify and describe the factors that Black cancer patients consider important in their decision to participate and remain in research and to provide a rich description of what is actually happening during their clinical research participation. This research is consistent with the mission of NINR to enhance scientific knowledge and reduce health disparities in clinical research.

Public Health Relevance

Few Black adults with cancer participate in research. To reduce cancer disparities among these patients, research is needed to identify and describe the factors that are important to Black cancer patients'research decisions and their day-to-day experiences of being a trial participant.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Type
Predoctoral Individual National Research Service Award (F31)
Project #
5F31NR013847-02
Application #
8666556
Study Section
Nursing Science Review Committee (NRRC)
Program Officer
Banks, David
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
Budget End
Support Year
2
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
University of Pennsylvania
Department
None
Type
Schools of Nursing
DUNS #
City
Philadelphia
State
PA
Country
United States
Zip Code
19104