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Public Health Relevance

Although most people are capable of limiting alcohol use for recreational purposes, others tend to drink in an excessive and uncontrolled fashion. In addition, these individuals often drink to alleviate aversive conditions associated with alcohol withdrawal (such as anxiety or depression), and are therefore described as being dependent on alcohol.
This research aims to understand the neural mechanisms of alcohol dependence and to facilitate the development of new medications that target excessive drinking in dependent individuals.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
Type
Postdoctoral Individual National Research Service Award (F32)
Project #
5F32AA018250-03
Application #
8123465
Study Section
Health Services Research Review Subcommittee (AA)
Program Officer
Grandison, Lindsey
Project Start
2009-04-13
Project End
2011-07-12
Budget Start
2011-04-13
Budget End
2011-07-12
Support Year
3
Fiscal Year
2011
Total Cost
$13,260
Indirect Cost
Name
Scripps Research Institute
Department
Type
DUNS #
781613492
City
La Jolla
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
92037
Edwards, Scott; Guerrero, Miguel; Ghoneim, Ola M et al. (2012) Evidence that vasopressin V1b receptors mediate the transition to excessive drinking in ethanol-dependent rats. Addict Biol 17:76-85
Edwards, Scott; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Schlosburg, Joel E et al. (2012) Development of mechanical hypersensitivity in rats during heroin and ethanol dependence: alleviation by CRFýýý receptor antagonism. Neuropharmacology 62:1142-51
Edwards, Scott; Koob, George F (2012) Experimental psychiatric illness and drug abuse models: from human to animal, an overview. Methods Mol Biol 829:31-48
Egli, Mark; Koob, George F; Edwards, Scott (2012) Alcohol dependence as a chronic pain disorder. Neurosci Biobehav Rev 36:2179-92
Edwards, Scott; Koob, George F (2010) Neurobiology of dysregulated motivational systems in drug addiction. Future Neurol 5:393-401