The lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) in the thalamus is a structure critical for processing visual information from the retina and sending this information to the visual cortex. Our understanding of the primate LGN has grown since the seminal work of Drs. David Hubel and Torsten Wiesel in the 1960s, but some significant gaps in knowledge still exist. First, mechanisms of nonlinear response gain modulation in parvocellular cell layers are poorly understood. Second, there exists only limited knowledge of the fine anatomical structure of functional cell types. Recent advances in visual stimulus presentation and extracellular recording technology will be utilized to address these gaps in knowledge. The research performed here will test the hypotheses that parvocellular neurons have nonlinear gain modulation and that functional cell types are clustered within LGN laminae. The results will have broad impacts on our understanding of information processing in the early visual system.

Public Health Relevance

The nonlinear properties and fine structural organization of the primate visual thalamus are poorly understood. We will address these identified gaps in knowledge through a series of electrophysiological experiments. The findings will improve our understanding of information processing in the early visual system.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Eye Institute (NEI)
Type
Postdoctoral Individual National Research Service Award (F32)
Project #
5F32EY025542-03
Application #
9388353
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRG1)
Program Officer
Agarwal, Neeraj
Project Start
2015-12-01
Project End
2018-11-30
Budget Start
2017-12-01
Budget End
2018-11-30
Support Year
3
Fiscal Year
2018
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
Massachusetts General Hospital
Department
Type
DUNS #
073130411
City
Boston
State
MA
Country
United States
Zip Code
02114
Killian, Nathaniel J; Vurro, Milena; Keith, Sarah B et al. (2016) Perceptual learning in a non-human primate model of artificial vision. Sci Rep 6:36329