The College of St. Catherine (CSC) will continue in its efforts to build institutional research capacity and promote research in the biomedical and behavioral sciences during EARDA Phase III. CSC has had great success in enhancing research capacity during EARDA Phase I and Phase II, as evident by the institutionalization of the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs (ORSP), an increase in the number of faculty applying for external funding, an increase in the number of students engaged in faculty-student collaborative research, ongoing efforts to provide training, mentoring, and support for faculty engaged in research and grant-seeking, and the successful implementation of five pilot studies in the biomedical and behavioral sciences. Continuation of EARDA Phase III funding will provide support for the expansion of the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs with additional FTE to increase the office's capacity to administer pre- and post-awarded processes, ensure compliance with state and federal regulations, promote research and grant-seeking to faculty and students, partner with internal organizations such as the Institutional Review Board (IRB) and Evaluation Leadership Team (ELT), and assist in strategic planning for new research initiatives such as a proposed comprehensive undergraduate research program. An expansion of the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs will allow for new initiatives including the establishment of a Scientific Review Panel to assist researchers in further developing scientifically meritorious proposals, the development and implementation of Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) Training for faculty and students, new efforts to showcase grants and research opportunities, the creation of a database of faculty research interests and activities, and efforts to strengthen internal and external partnerships and collaborations. EARDA funding will also provide support for pilot study awards that enable faculty in the biomedical and behavioral sciences to gather baseline data before seeking external funding.

Public Health Relevance

Support for research capacity-building and pilot studies is essential in order to enhance CSC's efforts to educate students to lead and influence in the biomedical and behavioral sciences and to assist faculty in making important contributions to public health. Faculty engaged in research in the biomedical and behavioral sciences make important contributions to knowledge relating to public health, and students benefit from enhanced teaching as well as opportunities to collaborate in research. Students who participate in faculty-collaborative research are more likely to pursue graduate education and careers in biomedical and behavioral fields, areas vital to the advancement of knowledge concerning public health. As the largest college for women in the United States, the College of St. Catherine plays a key role in providing opportunities for women to lead and influence in areas where women have traditionally been underrepresented and in providing opportunities for women to make meaningful contributions to public health knowledge.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD)
Type
Extramural Associate Research Development Award (EARDA) (G11)
Project #
5G11HD039786-08
Application #
7764780
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZHD1-DSR-W (11))
Program Officer
Flagg-Newton, Jean
Project Start
2001-09-01
Project End
2012-08-31
Budget Start
2010-02-01
Budget End
2012-08-31
Support Year
8
Fiscal Year
2010
Total Cost
$116,426
Indirect Cost
Name
College of St. Catherine
Department
Biology
Type
Schools of Arts and Sciences
DUNS #
071763676
City
St. Paul
State
MN
Country
United States
Zip Code
55105
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