Research Proposal: Relating laboratory measures of UE prosthesis performance to use in everyday life: A Pilot Study. Principal Investigator: Alexander W. Dromerick, MD Abstract Our long term objective is to improve the lives of veterans and civilians with upper extremity (UE) amputation by improving the treatments they receive. In this pilot proposal, we advance towards this goal by systematically evaluating use of prosthetic limbs in everyday life. We will use objective and self-report measures, and relate these real world measures to both commonly used and experimental laboratory-based measures. This work will provide pilot data about everyday use of prosthetic limbs and how they relate to commonly used laboratory measures of skill. It will also objectively evaluate whether two promising targets for improving prosthesis design and training (compensatory maneuvers of the trunk and residual limb;grip force control) are related to real-world use. If so, these could be targets for future prosthetic limb designs and training protocols. This pilot data will provide immediate preliminary insight into these important areas, and will form the basis for larger-scale definitive studies.
Our Aims :
Specific Aim 1 : Examine the relationship between subjective reports and objective indicators of everyday prosthesis use (arm motion and terminal device activation). These data will be used to estimate effect size for a subsequent larger scale definitive study.
Specific Aim 2 : Examine the relationship between laboratory measures of gross and fine motor performance, trunk compensation, and grip motor control with subjective and objective measures of everyday prosthesis use.

Public Health Relevance

Project Narrrative Amputee care has long been a significant component of the care offered to military veterans. The proposed project intends to compare clinical/laboratory measurement of UE prosthesis use and actual prosthetic arm use in the "real - world" setting. The recent influx of new UE amputees from military theater highlights the need for quality care. A better understanding of how laboratory measurements relate to actual prosthetic arm use will provide VHA clinicians and policy makers with the tools needed to make rationale decisions about the benefits and limitations of new technologies, training techniques, and other interventions.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
Veterans Affairs (VA)
Type
Non-HHS Research Projects (I01)
Project #
1I01RX000290-01
Application #
7872187
Study Section
Rehabilitation Engineering & Prosthetics/Orthotics (RRD5)
Project Start
2010-10-01
Project End
2012-09-30
Budget Start
2010-10-01
Budget End
2012-09-30
Support Year
1
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
U.S. Department/Vets Affairs Medical Center
Department
Type
DUNS #
129913026
City
Washington
State
DC
Country
United States
Zip Code
20422