The training and research plans of this second revised K01 application will directly advance the candidate's long term career goal of developing an independent, transdisciplinary line of research that investigates subtypes of risk for alcohol-related problems and of alcohol use disorders based on phenotypic and genotypic information. Career development is sought in statistical genetics (related to hypothesis generation and testing), molecular genetics, and their integration with alcohol studies. These training objectives will be accomplished through coursework, workshops, seminars, and conferences;through extensive mentoring and consulting with senior investigators whose research is directly relevant to this application;and through development of collaborations. These activities will provide the foundation for the research plan, which combines nontraditional quantitative methods with an intermediate phenotype approach to generate conceptually- and empirically-based hypotheses about neurogenetic influences on physiological processes using highly informative yet small scale (N<500) study data. More specifically, the research plan seeks to add a genetic component to two ongoing NIH-supported projects that examine the coordinated function of multiple dynamically-interrelated biological systems and that provide in depth assessment of psychosocial and psychophysiological characteristics related to alcohol use. Genomic DNA is being collected from young adult participants who span the continuum of substance use behaviors and single nucleotide polymorphisms in GABA-A receptor subunit genes will be used as initial genotype targets. A highly sensitive index of heart rate variability - at rest, during cue exposure and acute alcohol challenge - will be used as an initial intermediate phenotype. These initial targets may identify a subset of individuals with high addiction liability due to poor modulation of emotional arousal. The overall aim is to use advanced statistics as a novel approach to identifying the multiple pathways of risk for problematic alcohol use behaviors and suggesting new, targeted approaches to treatment. Hypotheses generated from these discovery-oriented, early-stage studies will subsequently be tested with independent samples gathered through collaborations and in de novo R01 applications. This application applies cutting-edge statistical strategies to the analysis of genetic and physiological data in an effort to explore the genetic basis of drinking behaviors in a new way. This approach may be useful for identifying subtypes of risk for alcohol-related problems and suggesting ways to make prevention, intervention and treatment programs more effective.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
Type
Research Scientist Development Award - Research & Training (K01)
Project #
5K01AA017473-04
Application #
8302416
Study Section
Health Services Research Review Subcommittee (AA)
Program Officer
Parsian, Abbas
Project Start
2009-07-10
Project End
2014-06-30
Budget Start
2012-07-01
Budget End
2013-06-30
Support Year
4
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$108,167
Indirect Cost
$8,012
Name
Rutgers University
Department
Psychology
Type
Other Domestic Higher Education
DUNS #
001912864
City
New Brunswick
State
NJ
Country
United States
Zip Code
08901
Fonoberova, Maria; Mezi?, Igor; Buckman, Jennifer F et al. (2014) A computational physiology approach to personalized treatment models: the beneficial effects of slow breathing on the human cardiovascular system. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 307:H1073-91
Buckman, Jennifer F; Farris, Samantha G; Yusko, David A (2013) A national study of substance use behaviors among NCAA male athletes who use banned performance enhancing substances. Drug Alcohol Depend 131:50-5
Bates, Marsha E; Buckman, Jennifer F; Nguyen, Tam T (2013) A role for cognitive rehabilitation in increasing the effectiveness of treatment for alcohol use disorders. Neuropsychol Rev 23:27-47
Udo, Tomoko; Mun, Eun-Young; Buckman, Jennifer F et al. (2013) Potential side effects of unhealthy lifestyle choices and health risks on basal and reactive heart rate variability in college drinkers. J Stud Alcohol Drugs 74:787-96
Eddie, D; Buckman, J F; Mun, E Y et al. (2013) Different associations of alcohol cue reactivity with negative alcohol expectancies in mandated and inpatient samples of young adults. Addict Behav 38:2040-3
Lehrer, Paul; Buckman, Jennifer F; Mun, Eun-Young et al. (2013) Negative mood and alcohol problems are related to respiratory dynamics in young adults. Appl Psychophysiol Biofeedback 38:273-83
Flausino, Noler Heyden; Da Silva Prado, Juliana Martuscelli; de Queiroz, Sandra Souza et al. (2012) Physical exercise performed before bedtime improves the sleep pattern of healthy young good sleepers. Psychophysiology 49:186-92
Vaschillo, Evgeny G; Vaschillo, Bronya; Buckman, Jennifer F et al. (2012) Measurement of vascular tone and stroke volume baroreflex gain. Psychophysiology 49:193-7
Bates, Marsha E; Buckman, Jennifer F; Vaschillo, Evgeny G et al. (2011) The redistribution of power: neurocardiac signaling, alcohol and gender. PLoS One 6:e28281
Buckman, Jennifer F; Yusko, David A; Farris, Samantha G et al. (2011) Risk of marijuana use in male and female college student athletes and nonathletes. J Stud Alcohol Drugs 72:586-91

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