Latinos age 65 or older have a higher prevalence of type 2 diabetes, and more severe complications from the disease, compared to non-Latino Whites. Latino elders'consequent risks for functional impairment and permanent disability raise questions about their family environment and the role caregivers play in helping them to manage the disease. Studying the family environment is important for addressing and eventually eliminating Latinos'health disparities arising from this chronic disease. The purpose of this Career Development Award is to provide mentored research and professional training to prepare me for a career as a federally-funded, independent investigator on health disparities and aging research in the area of family care of older Latinos. My immediate goals are to 1) develop a research program that characterizes the care of older adults within the Mexican-origin family;and 2) develop proficiency in culturally-relevant interventions for Latino elders and their caregivers. I propose to move my research beyond the female caregiver, toward a family level approach to elder care along one specific health dimension, management of type 2 diabetes. The K01 award builds directly on my current work by 1) including the perspectives of caregiving men and diabetic care-receiving elders;and 2) examining the process of family elder care through observation of caregiver-care receiver dyads (CG-CR dyad) in home settings. I propose three phases of research that culminate in developing and evaluating the feasibility of a CG-CR dyad intervention to improve care receiving Latino elders'diabetes outcomes. The training aspect of this award will provide me with in-depth knowledge in: 1) theory development and measurement of family care of Latino elders;2) observational methods in home settings;and 3) intervention development and evaluation. My long-term objective is to establish a research trajectory based on theoretical and empirical principles that can be applied in real-world settings to improve the health outcomes of community-dwelling Latino elders. The interdisciplinary mentoring team I put together and my affiliations with the UCLA RCMAR and the UCLA School of Public Health provide the infrastructure to support these endeavors.

Public Health Relevance

The proposed research focuses on older Latinos, the largest and second fastest aging sub-population in the United States. Many older Latinos have diabetes and suffer severe consequences from the disease, leading to poor health and disability. This research looks at the role of family caregivers in Latino elders'management of diabetes, one step toward finding ways to improve Latino elders'health in this area.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Type
Research Scientist Development Award - Research & Training (K01)
Project #
5K01AG033122-05
Application #
8302324
Study Section
National Institute on Aging Initial Review Group (NIA)
Program Officer
Gerald, Melissa S
Project Start
2009-09-15
Project End
2014-07-31
Budget Start
2012-08-01
Budget End
2013-07-31
Support Year
5
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$161,995
Indirect Cost
$9,067
Name
Oregon State University
Department
Other Health Professions
Type
Other Domestic Higher Education
DUNS #
053599908
City
Corvallis
State
OR
Country
United States
Zip Code
97339
Herrera, Angelica P; Mendez-Luck, Carolyn A; Crist, Janice D et al. (2013) Psychosocial and cognitive health differences by caregiver status among older Mexican Americans. Community Ment Health J 49:61-72
Hoffman, Geoffrey J; Lee, Jihey; Mendez-Luck, Carolyn A (2012) Health behaviors among Baby Boomer informal caregivers. Gerontologist 52:219-30
Hoffman, Geoffrey J; Mendez-Luck, Carolyn A (2011) Stressed and strapped: caregivers in California. Policy Brief UCLA Cent Health Policy Res :1-8
Mendez-Luck, Carolyn A; Trejo, Laura; Miranda, Jeanne et al. (2011) Recruitment strategies and costs associated with community-based research in a Mexican-origin population. Gerontologist 51 Suppl 1:S94-105