Dr. Mosavel's career goal is to establish herself as an independent investigator in cancer control and behavioral research with a focus on African-Americans in low-income neighborhoods. The goal of this application is to integrate a strong mentoring, training, and focused research agenda to enable her to: 1) become an independent health disparities researcher who conducts large scale, community-based behavioral cancer interventions and 2) develop and strengthen her mixed methods skill set to effectively evaluate cancer interventions. The research plan examines the feasibility of the mother and adolescent daughter dyad, particularly from low-income, African-American households, as a unique portal within which to communicate critical cancer prevention and control information. The prevailing health promotion paradigm is that parents give their children advice about health. Consequently, there has been minimal focus on the influence that adolescents can have on their parents'health behaviors. The present study will focus on assessing the daughters'ability to influence their mothers'cancer screening behaviors. There are three specific aims.
The first aim i s to explore and identify the necessary conditions for effective giving and receiving of breast and cervical cancer information within the mother-daughter dyad.
The second aim i s to design the delivery and evaluate the comprehension, credibility and emotional response associated with the daughter-initiated cancer message. Finally, the third aim is to conduct a study of a daughter-focused intervention to examine its effect on mothers'breast and cervical cancer screening behaviors. This study has the potential to utilize the assets of the mother-daughter dyad and promote cancer dialogue in the family. Consequently, a daughter-initiated intervention may have a significant impact on mothers'health behavior. Mothers who receive guided support and encouragement from their daughters may be more responsive to cancer screening messages and more likely to obtain a Pap smear and mammogram when compared to mothers who do not. Likewise, adolescent daughters who are provided with opportunities to discuss cancer prevention may, in turn, grow more knowledgeable and intent on eventually obtaining a Pap smear and mammogram. The proposed research will highlight the conditions that will lead to effective mother-daughter communication about breast and cervical cancer and an understanding of the processes related to this information sharing. Finally, the findings from the proposed research will lead to subsequent R21 and R01 community-based cancer intervention research.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Research Scientist Development Award - Research & Training (K01)
Project #
5K01CA132960-06
Application #
8307956
Study Section
Subcommittee G - Education (NCI)
Program Officer
Ojeifo, John O
Project Start
2008-08-01
Project End
2013-07-31
Budget Start
2012-08-01
Budget End
2013-07-31
Support Year
6
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$134,460
Indirect Cost
$9,960
Name
Virginia Commonwealth University
Department
Other Health Professions
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
105300446
City
Richmond
State
VA
Country
United States
Zip Code
23298
Ports, Katie A; Barnack-Tavlaris, Jessica L; Syme, Maggie L et al. (2014) Sexual health discussions with older adult patients during periodic health exams. J Sex Med 11:901-8
Ports, Katie A; Barnack-Tavlaris, Jessica L; Mosavel, Maghboeba et al. (2014) Young Women's Sexual and Reproductive Health Post HPV Vaccination. Womens Reprod Health (Phila) 1:43-55
Mosavel, Maghboeba; Ports, Katie; Leighton-Herrmann, Ellyn (2014) Mother-Daughter Dyad Recruitment and Cancer Intervention Challenges in an African American Sample. J Racial Ethn Health Disparities 1:120-129
Mosavel, Maghboeba; Genderson, Maureen Wilson (2013) From adolescent daughter to mother: exploring message design strategies for breast and cervical cancer prevention and screening. J Cancer Educ 28:558-64
Ports, Katie A; Reddy, Diane M; Rameshbabu, Anjali (2013) Barriers and facilitators to HPV vaccination: perspectives from Malawian women. Women Health 53:630-45