HIV/AIDS has been an international crisis for decades. All current research suggests that there is not likely to be any medical cure anytime soon, and that prevention is the best strategy that we can employ. However, notwithstanding that HIV/AIDS prevention has been the goal and primary focus of funding internationally for decades, we still see a sharp increase in the number of new HIV/AIDS cases across the globe annually. Clearly, there needs to be more focus and research dedicated to ensuring that we are using the best prevention techniques possible. My long term goal is to develop new methodologies for advancing clinical and community AIDS behavioral research. In addition, my aim is to develop new methods that will lead to enhanced HIV prevention interventions. This application supports the mission of the National Institute of Mental Health by providing methodologies for incomplete data, this will be used to help develop effective interventions and by providing training to position this candidate to engage in future research to improve the HIV prevention.

Public Health Relevance

HIV/AIDS has been an international crisis for decades. All current research suggests that there is not likely to be any medical cure anytime soon, and that prevention is the best strategy that we can employ. My long term goal is to develop new methodologies for advancing clinical and community AIDS behavioral research. In addition, my aim is to develop new methods that will lead to enhanced HIV prevention interventions, In particular, methods to deal with incomplete data.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Type
Research Scientist Development Award - Research & Training (K01)
Project #
5K01MH087219-03
Application #
8246512
Study Section
Behavioral and Social Science Approaches to Preventing HIV/AIDS Study Section (BSPH)
Program Officer
Brouwers, Pim
Project Start
2010-04-09
Project End
2015-01-31
Budget Start
2012-02-01
Budget End
2013-01-31
Support Year
3
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$179,677
Indirect Cost
$13,309
Name
University of Connecticut
Department
Biostatistics & Other Math Sci
Type
Schools of Arts and Sciences
DUNS #
614209054
City
Storrs-Mansfield
State
CT
Country
United States
Zip Code
06269
Kalichman, Seth C; Simbayi, Leickness C; Cain, Demetria et al. (2014) Randomized community-level HIV prevention intervention trial for men who drink in South African alcohol-serving venues. Eur J Public Health 24:833-9
Siddique, Juned; Harel, Ofer; Crespi, Catherine M et al. (2014) Binary variable multiple-model multiple imputation to address missing data mechanism uncertainty: application to a smoking cessation trial. Stat Med 33:3013-28
Harel, Ofer; Boyko, Jennifer (2013) Mi??ing data: should we c?re? Am J Public Health 103:200-1
Eaton, Lisa A; Kalichman, Seth C; Kenny, David A et al. (2013) A reanalysis of a behavioral intervention to prevent incident HIV infections: including indirect effects in modeling outcomes of Project EXPLORE. AIDS Care 25:805-11
Cain, Demetria; Pitpitan, Eileen V; Eaton, Lisa et al. (2013) Collective efficacy and HIV prevention in South African townships. J Community Health 38:885-93
Matthews, Gregory J; Harel, Ofer (2013) An examination of data confidentiality and disclosure issues related to publication of empirical ROC curves. Acad Radiol 20:889-96
Harel, Ofer; Chung, Hwan; Miglioretti, Diana (2013) Latent class regression: inference and estimation with two-stage multiple imputation. Biom J 55:541-53
Scott-Sheldon, Lori A J; Carey, Michael P; Carey, Kate B et al. (2012) Patterns of alcohol use and sexual behaviors among current drinkers in Cape Town, South Africa. Addict Behav 37:492-7
Harel, Ofer; Pellowski, Jennifer; Kalichman, Seth (2012) Are we missing the importance of missing values in HIV prevention randomized clinical trials? Review and recommendations. AIDS Behav 16:1382-93
Harel, Ofer; Demirtas, Hakan (2011) Re: Joint modeling of missing data due to non-participation and death in longitudinal aging studies by K. B. Rajan and S. E. Leurgans, Statistics in Medicine 2010; 29:2260-2268. Stat Med 30:2663-5; author reply 2666-8