An estimated 201,000 new cases of lung cancer will be diagnosed in the United States in 2012. Lung cancer, the most common cause of cancer-related mortality, causes nearly 150,000 deaths annually. It is estimated that the costs of taking care of patients with lung cancer exceed $40 billion annually. Despite the tremendous impact of lung cancer on society, there are no reliable, clinically applicable methods to predict post-treatment outcomes in lung cancer patients. It has been shown that survival after diagnosis of lung cancer depends on both patient and tumor characteristics. Type of treatment or operation also impacts survival. Previous attempts at creating predictive models for survival after treatment for lung cancer have been severely limited by lack of detailed patient information, methodologic issues, and lack of validation. This career development proposal is designed to provide training and support for the applicant to become an independent clinical researcher focused on evaluating and modeling outcomes in thoracic oncology. The career development goals of this proposal are;1. Obtain didactic training for a strong foundation in responsible conduct of research, research design, statistics, modeling methodology, decision analysis, and communication of risk to patients and providers. 2. Develop expertise in creating predictive models to assess competing therapies for common thoracic cancers and performing cost-effectiveness analyses. 3. Develop the skills necessary to communicate and disseminate results of the studies, implement research findings in practice, and influence change in policy and healthcare delivery to improve outcomes. The short-term career development goals will be accomplished by completing a Master of Science in Clinical Investigation degree at Washington University. To develop the practical skill set, the applicant will utilize decision analytic modelig to evaluate and predict long-term survival after surgery or radiation therapy for patients with early-stage lung cancer. Similar methods will be used to study the effectiveness and cost- effectiveness of treatment options for locally advanced lung cancer. The clinical objective is to develop and disseminate tools that can predict survival after treatment for lung cancer and to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of treatment options. The models will be made available to clinicians and the public on the Washington University website via an electronic, user-friendly interface. The models will support investigators seeking to assess prognosis for patients. Our results will also serve as baseline for assessing the value of new and emerging tests like genetic studies, which could be compared to and incorporated into the models. The career objective of the proposal is to develop the candidate into an independent investigator, who can implement modeling approaches to assess the impact of interventions on clinical care in oncology.

Public Health Relevance

This career development proposal is designed to provide training and support for the applicant to become an independent clinical researcher focused on evaluating and modeling outcomes in thoracic oncology. The applicant will complete the Post-doctoral Program at the Clinical Research Training Center of the Washington University School of Medicine to obtain a Master of Science in Clinical Investigation degree. To gain practical experience, the applicant will learn and utilize decision analytic modeling to study and predict post-treatment outcomes in lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the United States.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Academic/Teacher Award (ATA) (K07)
Project #
1K07CA178120-01
Application #
8566243
Study Section
Subcommittee G - Education (NCI)
Program Officer
Perkins, Susan N
Project Start
2013-09-01
Project End
2018-08-31
Budget Start
2013-09-01
Budget End
2014-08-31
Support Year
1
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$157,287
Indirect Cost
$10,836
Name
Washington University
Department
Surgery
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
068552207
City
Saint Louis
State
MO
Country
United States
Zip Code
63130
Samson, Pamela; Robinson, Clifford G; Bradley, Jeffrey et al. (2016) The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program risk calculator does not adequately stratify risk for patients with clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 151:697-705.e1
Broderick, Stephen R; Patel, Aalok P; Crabtree, Traves D et al. (2016) Pneumonectomy for Clinical Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: The Effect of Neoadjuvant Therapy. Ann Thorac Surg 101:451-8
Samson, Pamela; Robinson, Clifford; Bradley, Jeffrey et al. (2016) Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy versus Chemoradiation Prior to Esophagectomy: Impact on Rate of Complete Pathologic Response and Survival in Esophageal Cancer Patients. J Thorac Oncol 11:2227-2237
Bott, Matthew J; Patel, Aalok P; Verma, Vivek et al. (2016) Patterns of care in hilar node-positive (N1) non-small cell lung cancer: A missed treatment opportunity? J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 151:1549-1558.e2
Brescia, Alexander A; Broderick, Stephen R; Crabtree, Traves D et al. (2016) Adjuvant Therapy for Positive Nodes After Induction Therapy and Resection of Esophageal Cancer. Ann Thorac Surg 101:200-8; discussion 208-10
Samson, Pamela; Puri, Varun; Robinson, Clifford et al. (2016) Clinical T2N0 Esophageal Cancer: Identifying Pretreatment Characteristics Associated With Pathologic Upstaging and the Potential Role for Induction Therapy. Ann Thorac Surg 101:2102-11
Puri, Varun; Patel, Aalok P; Crabtree, Traves D et al. (2015) Unexpected readmission after lung cancer surgery: A benign event? J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 150:1496-1504, 1505.e1-5; discussio
Scheel 3rd, Paul J; Crabtree, Traves D; Bell, Jennifer M et al. (2015) Does surgeon experience affect outcomes in pathologic stage I lung cancer? J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 149:998-1004.e1
Samson, Pamela; Patel, Aalok; Crabtree, Traves D et al. (2015) Multidisciplinary Treatment for Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Does Institution Type Matter? Ann Thorac Surg 100:1773-9
Bott, Matthew J; Patel, Aalok P; Crabtree, Traves D et al. (2015) Role for Surgical Resection in the Multidisciplinary Treatment of Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer. Ann Thorac Surg 99:1921-8

Showing the most recent 10 out of 25 publications