The overall purpose of this proposed NEI K12, Michigan Vision Clinician-Scientist Development Program is to increase the number and effectiveness of clinician-scientists in ophthalmology and vision sciences through interdisciplinary, interdepartmental faculty development bridging the transition to research independence. The specific objective is to provide a superb, new mentored clinician-scientist career development program at the University of Michigan, in a highly collegial environment that includes an extensive array of didactic opportunities and core facilities. This proposal is based on the recent expansion of the faculty and laboratory and clinical research infrastructure, extensive interdisciplinary research opportunities within the University of Michigan, and the need to advance clinician-scientists into successful research careers. The University of Michigan excels in many vision-sciences areas that complement current NEI K12 awards, notably retinal stem cells and regeneration, diabetic retinopathy, epidemiology and biostatistics, and thyroid eye disease. The Program is designed to ensure success of clinician-scientists in ophthalmology, visual sciences, and health services research by providing protected research time and strong examples of bench and bedside research. The Program includes mentors who will foster the careers of women and minorities. The Michigan Vision Clinician-Scientist Development Program will allow premier scholars to create tailored research career development plans that connect their basic and clinical research interests with medical or surgical specialties. The University of Michigan is uniquely poised to fill a niche by developing novel research directions to deliver new advances to persons suffering from eye disease. The following specific aims describe two paths that feature laboratory or clinic-based studies from broad areas of biomedical research.
Specific Aim 1 will provide scholars in the laboratory science path with the knowledge and technologies needed to study fundamental mechanisms and pathogenesis of vision-threatening diseases.
Specific Aim 2 will provide scholars in the clinical science path with leading-edge knowledge and technologies to conduct patient-based investigations. The two paths in Michigan Vision Clinician-Scientist Development Program converge to produce superbly trained clinician-scientists who will transition to independent funding and long-term research career success. Our proposal demonstrates the exceptional enthusiasm, commitment and environment for this distinctive mentored training program at the University of Michigan that will bring new research leaders to American ophthalmology and vision research.

Public Health Relevance

The proposed NEI K12, Michigan Vision Clinician-Scientist Development Program seeks to increase the number and effectiveness of clinician-scientists in ophthalmology and vision sciences through interdisciplinary, interdepartmental faculty development bridging the transition to research independence. The Program fills a niche in mentored research involving retinal stem cells and regeneration, diabetic retinopathy, epidemiology and biostatistics, and thyroid eye disease.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Eye Institute (NEI)
Type
Physician Scientist Award (Program) (PSA) (K12)
Project #
1K12EY022299-01A1
Application #
8469653
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZEY1-VSN (06))
Program Officer
Agarwal, Neeraj
Project Start
2013-05-15
Project End
2018-04-30
Budget Start
2013-05-15
Budget End
2014-04-30
Support Year
1
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$459,121
Indirect Cost
$34,009
Name
University of Michigan Ann Arbor
Department
Ophthalmology
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
073133571
City
Ann Arbor
State
MI
Country
United States
Zip Code
48109
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Newman-Casey, Paula Anne; Stem, Maxwell; Talwar, Nidhi et al. (2014) Risk factors associated with developing branch retinal vein occlusion among enrollees in a United States managed care plan. Ophthalmology 121:1939-48