This revised K24 application proposes a mentorship program in patient-oriented research in pediatric asthma, with a specific focus on health care disparities and disease management behaviors. The K24 Candidate is an Associate Professor (Research) in the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior of the Warren Alpert Medical School at Brown University, with a history of funding in behavioral interventions to improve disease management and address health disparities in pediatric asthma. Training Plan: The candidate will obtain additional training in longitudinal data analysis, behavioral genetics, evaluation and assessment in health education, and health care access for Latino immigrants to enrich her skills and mentoring capacity in future health care disparities research. Research Plan: A longitudinal study of medication adherence for Latinos and non-Latino white (NLW) youth with asthma is proposed to assess the differential course of medication adherence by culture across the transition to adolescence. Three waves of 50 youth with persistent asthma (150 total, 25 Latino, 25 NLW in each wave) will complete a multimethod assessment of asthma status, family factors, medication beliefs, and controller medication use. Assessments will occur in eighth grade, then again in tenth grade, with continuous monitoring of medication adherence throughout. Analyses will evaluate the role of medication beliefs and family connectedness in supporting asthma management in Latino and NLW youth with persistent asthma, and assess differential trajectories of medication use by ethnic group over time. Mentoring Plan: The proposed mentoring plan offers participation in an RCT to address asthma disparities in medication use, access to an ongoing educational program for asthma that serves over 700 families a year, and an archival dataset that includes a wealth of data on disease management behavior in over 800 Latino and NLW children in Rl and Puerto Rico. An additional ongoing seminar is planned for junior faculty on topics such as recruiting and retaining culturally diverse samples, and preparing research grant applications. This overall plan capitalizes on the rich resources and training opportunities available to postdoctoral fellows and junior faculty at Brown, including seven T32 fellowship programs, numerous junior faculty with K awards and small grants, seminars in research design, ethics, and statistics, and established infrastructure for evaluation.

Public Health Relevance

Public Health Significance: Asthma is a common chronic illness in which minority children are disproportionately affected. Facilitating mentorship and execution of high quality patient-oriented research in this area is critical to address health care disparities. PROJECT/

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD)
Type
Midcareer Investigator Award in Patient-Oriented Research (K24)
Project #
5K24HD058794-04
Application #
8294775
Study Section
Pediatrics Subcommittee (CHHD)
Program Officer
Haverkos, Lynne
Project Start
2009-06-15
Project End
2014-05-31
Budget Start
2012-06-01
Budget End
2013-05-31
Support Year
4
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$111,972
Indirect Cost
$8,294
Name
Rhode Island Hospital
Department
Type
DUNS #
075710996
City
Providence
State
RI
Country
United States
Zip Code
02903
Tooley, Erin M; Busch, Andrew; McQuaid, Elizabeth L et al. (2015) Structural and Functional Support in the Prediction of Smoking Cessation in Caregivers of Children with Asthma. Behav Med 41:203-10
McQuaid, Elizabeth L; Fedele, David A; Adams, Sue K et al. (2014) Complementary and alternative medicine use and adherence to asthma medications among Latino and non-Latino white families. Acad Pediatr 14:192-9
Fedele, David A; Rosales, Alvina; Everhart, Robin S et al. (2014) The role of alternate caregivers in the management of pediatric asthma. J Pediatr Psychol 39:643-52
McQuaid, Elizabeth L; Spirito, Anthony (2012) Integrating research into clinical internship training bridging the science/practice gap in pediatric psychology. J Pediatr Psychol 37:149-57