This revised K24 Mid-Career Investigator Award in Patient-Oriented Research (POR) is the next logical step in my career at The Johns Hopkins University (JHU) School of Medicine (SOM). The K24 will help me enhance my mentoring of early-career MD investigators in POR and advance my mentoring and research skills in areas that address the NIMH Strategic Plan priorities for translational research. Specifically, in light f recent advances in the biology of pediatric anxiety (March, 2011), important questions have been raised about the role of biomarkers in predicting treatment outcomes. The training of mid-career intervention researchers in methods that enable them to integrate biological markers into clinical trials is thus critical and timely. Broadening my research skills in this area will enableme to make a significant contribution to the field of child anxiety and it will enhance my ability to effectively mentor junior clinician-investigators with MDs who focus on the biological bases of illness and pharmacological interventions. In this K24 application, I propose to take relevant courses (e.g., psychopharmacology, behavioral endocrinology), complete "hands on" lab work, and conduct novel research in this area.
The specific aims of this K24 application are to: 1) recruit and mentor junior investigators, particularly MDs, in POR;2) enhance my mentoring and research skills in psychopharmacology and biomarkers of anxiety;and 3) apply these skills in an innovative line of research examining whether levels of salivary cortisol and alpha amylase and/or their interaction: a) differentiate treatment responders, non-responders, and healthy controls (N = 180), and b) prospectively predict remission or relapse of disorder. The study makes efficient use of NIMH funds and resources by proposing an "add on" study to the PIs NIMH-funded R01 entitled "Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multi-modal Extended Long-term Study" (CAMELS, Ginsburg, PI), which is a five year prospective follow-up study of anxious youth initially randomized in the Child/ Adolescent Anxiety Multi-modal Study (CAMS).

Public Health Relevance

This revised four-year K24 application, entitled Integrating Biological Markers into Clinical Research, proposes to 1) recruit and mentor junior investigators, particularly MDs, in patient-oriented research, 2) enhance the mentoring and research skills of the PI in psychopharmacology and biomarkers of anxiety, and 3) apply these new skills in a new line of research examining whether levels of salivary cortisol and alpha amylase and/or their interaction: a) differentiates treatment responders, non-responders, and healthy controls (N = 180), and b) prospectively predict remission or relapse of disorder. This new research efficiently uses NIMH funds and resources by proposing an add on study to the PIs NIMH funded R01 (i.e., the Child/ Adolescent Anxiety Multi-modal Extended Long-term Study (CAMELS), a five year prospective study following up anxious youth who were treated in the Child/ Adolescent Anxiety Multi-modal Study. It also addresses the Institute's research priorities.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Type
Midcareer Investigator Award in Patient-Oriented Research (K24)
Project #
1K24MH096760-01A1
Application #
8442480
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZMH1-ERB-B (05))
Program Officer
Goldstein, Amy B
Project Start
2013-02-01
Project End
2016-12-31
Budget Start
2013-02-01
Budget End
2013-12-31
Support Year
1
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$164,412
Indirect Cost
$12,179
Name
Johns Hopkins University
Department
Psychiatry
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
001910777
City
Baltimore
State
MD
Country
United States
Zip Code
21218