Harvard Catalyst has transcended the boundaries long imposed by the historical, corporate, and cultural independence of Harvard and its 17 affiliated academic healthcare centers (AHCs) to bring cross-disciplinary investigators together to collaborate and form teams to conduct clinical and translational (CT) research. Today education, resources and services are jointly planned, executed, broadly shared, and evaluated with the common goal of improving the quality, speed, safety, efficiency and cost across the entire spectrum of CT research. Ongoing CTSA recognition coupled with the opportunity to be a significant participant in the Consortium will enable Harvard Catalyst to implement its vision and strategic plan. First, we will convene investigators from our 11 schools and 17 AHCs to identify and prioritize the most important opportunities in CT research. We will help them to connect with one another to form cross-disciplinary teams and then provide them with the opportunities, incentives, and access to outstanding education and resources in an environment that values innovation, collaboration, and team science. Second, we will work with our schools and AHCs to build and grow an environment where discoveries are rapidly and efficiently translated to improve human health. Simply stated, Harvard Catalyst strives to be a Convener, Connector and Catalyst to hasten and improve the quality CT research. To this end, we have structured our academic home to create an integrated pathway of education, training, and career development and to provide a full portfolio of innovative resources and services to address identified gaps and investigator needs. Within five years, our achievements will include: 1) a continuous, sustainable, robust pipeline of future team leaders across all CT domains;2) implementation of SHRINE-CT coupled with resolution of regulatory hurdles to allow nvestigators to rapidly identify, contact, and accrue specific patients to clinical trials across institutions and throughout the Consortium;3) establishment of a team of experts who will reduce the barriers to engagement and entry to human experimentation thereby growing and diversifying the community of investigators who conduct CT research;4) infrastructure to provide all CT investigators access to the resources they need to conduct human clinical studies wherever their work is best done;and 5) systematic investigation of innovative methodologies to incentivize, form and nurture teams to create new preventions, biomarkers, and therapeutics. These achievements will continue the transformation of CT research at Harvard with the goal of catalyzing a """"""""One Harvard"""""""" community and culture committed to improving health.

Public Health Relevance

The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center supports an academic home that creates an integrated research and training environment across Harvard Medical School and its partner institutions in order to improve human health. It provides and/or creates access to resources and services to support all steps of clinical research across the full spectrum of clinical and translational research, and facilitates the training and career development of the translational research workforce.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS)
Type
Mentored Career Development Award (KL2)
Project #
5KL2TR001100-02
Application #
8743343
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAI1-PTM-C (S1))
Program Officer
Talbot, Bernard
Project Start
2013-09-26
Project End
2018-04-30
Budget Start
2014-05-01
Budget End
2015-04-30
Support Year
2
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$1,738,300
Indirect Cost
Name
Harvard Medical School
Department
Internal Medicine/Medicine
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
047006379
City
Boston
State
MA
Country
United States
Zip Code
02115
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