The overall goals of the Administrative Core are to provide general scientific, programmatic and fiscal leadership, facilitate lines of communication between the different researchers involved in the Program Project, maintain coherence of the organization in the context of the overall objectives and long-range goals, and ensure that the resources that result from the Program will benefit the scientific community. In the context of the above, the tasks of this core include the effective coordination of activities in the 5 research projects and the Animal and Pathology Core towards unraveling the role of genome maintenance in aging and longevity, the selection and breeding of the jointly used mouse models, the mobilization of new technology and tools that can help us accomplishing our tasks quicker and more efficiently, to maintain and update our Mouse Database for effective utilization by researchers in this PPG, and to provide the scientific community access to the PPG's resources, information and technologies through the internet.

Public Health Relevance

The wide diversity of researchers at different locations, sharing the same resources, requires a strong centralizing force capable of synthesizing the new concepts and results emerging from this program project and make its resources available to the scientific community. It is this requirement that is central to the Administrative Core of this program project.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Type
Research Program Projects (P01)
Project #
5P01AG017242-16
Application #
8437198
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAG1-ZIJ-5)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-04-01
Budget End
2014-03-31
Support Year
16
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$120,109
Indirect Cost
$47,754
Name
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Department
Type
DUNS #
110521739
City
Bronx
State
NY
Country
United States
Zip Code
10461
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