The Administrative/Leadership &Biostatistics Core of the Program Project (PPG) exists entirely to support the work of the Projects and Transgenic Animal Core. The Administrative/Leadership &Biostatistics Core is dedicated to the following Specific Aims: 1. Stimulate and facilitate strategic planning, scientific activities, and interactions among the projects and core;2. Interact with administrative personnel of the University of Michigan (UM) Department of Molecular &Integrative Physiology, the DM Division of Research Development and Administration, and administrative personnel for each project and core to address financial and regulatory issues associated with the successful execution of scientific goals;3. Maintain communication with and provide necessary documentation of activities to the National Institute on Aging;4. Facilitate data sharing among the three Projects and acquisition of statistical support;and 5. Organize, co-ordinate, and chair meetings of the Scientific Advisory Committee. The Core is housed physically in the newly opened Basic Science Research Building and resides administratively in the Department of Physiology in the School of Medicine. Thus, a major activity of the Administrative/Leadership component involves integrating the roles of Project Director, John Faulkner;Associate Project Director, Susan Brooks;and Administrative Associate, Jane Heibel with the administrative structure of the Physiology Department. This Core group handles day-today administrative and financial operations of the PPG. Final administrative and scientific responsibility for the PPG resides with the Project Director, in consultation with the Associate Project Director as well as considerable input from each Project Leader. The Biostatistics Unit is directed by Lisa Larkin in consultation with Andrzej Galecki. This Unit provides statistical support to all projects and facilitates data sharing among projects. The relevance to public health of the PPG lies in its focus on the major public health problem of 'frailty and failure to thrive'among the elderly, estimated to currently cost $90 billion per year in the U.S. with a doubling time of 40 years, as both the elderly population and the number of frail people among the elderly increase. Geriatricians cite a lack of understanding of mechanisms underlying frailty as a major factor contributing to the lack of progress in the treatment of the condition. With a focus on understanding the mechanisms underlying the aging-associated changes that result in physical frailty, this PPG has the potential to determine and distinguish the factors underlying the condition that constitute changes intimately coupled to the aging process itself from those that are preventable or treatable by scientifically-based medical or behavioral interventions or public health programs.

Public Health Relevance

to public health of the PPG lies in its focus on the major public health problem of 'frailty and failure to thrive'among the elderly, estimated to currently cost $90 billion per year in the U.S. with a doubling time of 40 years, as both the elderly population and the number of frail people among the elderly increase. Geriatricians cite a lack of understanding of mechanisms underlying frailty as a major factor contributing to the lack of progress in the treatment of the condition. With a focus on understanding the mechanisms underlying the aging-associated changes that result in physical frailty, this PPG has the potential to determine and distinguish the factors underlying the condition that constitute changes intimately coupled to the aging process itself from those that are preventable or treatable by scientifically-based medical or behavioral interventions or public health programs.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Type
Research Program Projects (P01)
Project #
5P01AG020591-10
Application #
8375564
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAG1-ZIJ-5)
Project Start
Project End
2014-04-30
Budget Start
2012-05-01
Budget End
2013-04-30
Support Year
10
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$168,667
Indirect Cost
$57,701
Name
University of Michigan Ann Arbor
Department
Type
DUNS #
073133571
City
Ann Arbor
State
MI
Country
United States
Zip Code
48109
Sakellariou, Giorgos K; Pearson, Timothy; Lightfoot, Adam P et al. (2016) Mitochondrial ROS regulate oxidative damage and mitophagy but not age-related muscle fiber atrophy. Sci Rep 6:33944
Sloboda, Darcée D; Brooks, Susan V (2016) Treatment with selectin blocking antibodies after lengthening contractions of mouse muscle blunts neutrophil accumulation but does not reduce damage. Physiol Rep 4:
Sakellariou, Giorgos K; Pearson, Timothy; Lightfoot, Adam P et al. (2016) Long-term administration of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mitoquinone mesylate fails to attenuate age-related oxidative damage or rescue the loss of muscle mass and function associated with aging of skeletal muscle. FASEB J 30:3771-3785
Vasilaki, Aphrodite; Pollock, Natalie; Giakoumaki, Ifigeneia et al. (2016) The effect of lengthening contractions on neuromuscular junction structure in adult and old mice. Age (Dordr) 38:259-272
Zhang, Yiqiang; Unnikrishnan, Archana; Deepa, Sathyaseelan S et al. (2016) A new role for oxidative stress in aging: The accelerated aging phenotype in Sod1(-/)(-) mice is correlated to increased cellular senescence. Redox Biol 11:30-37
Zhang, Yiqiang; Liu, Yuhong; Walsh, Michael et al. (2016) Liver specific expression of Cu/ZnSOD extends the lifespan of Sod1 null mice. Mech Ageing Dev 154:1-8
Claflin, Dennis R; Jackson, Malcolm J; Brooks, Susan V (2015) Age affects the contraction-induced mitochondrial redox response in skeletal muscle. Front Physiol 6:21
Walsh, Michael E; Bhattacharya, Arunabh; Sataranatarajan, Kavithalakshmi et al. (2015) The histone deacetylase inhibitor butyrate improves metabolism and reduces muscle atrophy during aging. Aging Cell 14:957-70
Roche, Stuart M; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Brooks, Susan V et al. (2015) Measurement of Maximum Isometric Force Generated by Permeabilized Skeletal Muscle Fibers. J Vis Exp :e52695
Ivannikov, Maxim V; Van Remmen, Holly (2015) Sod1 gene ablation in adult mice leads to physiological changes at the neuromuscular junction similar to changes that occur in old wild-type mice. Free Radic Biol Med 84:254-62

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