The Administration Core acts to ensure that the research and programmatic goals of the Adult Children Study program project grant (ACS PPG) are met. The administrative leadership consists of the Director (Morris) and the Executive Director (Buckles). They are assisted by the Executive Committee that includes these individuals, leaders of Cores and Projects, and other senior faculty. The Administration Core supports, monitors, and coordinates the activities of all components of the ACS PPG. It will annually convene an External Advisory Committee to review activities and progress.
The specific aims are to: 1. Coordinate and integrate the Cores and Projects and provide administrative and budgetary support and oversight, ensuring appropriate utilization of funds 2. Monitor the effectiveness of the PPG toward achieving the stated goals 3. Arrange for periodic external review and advice concerning PPG goals and progress 4. Coordinate and oversee data integration with Washington University Center for Biomedical Informatics to develop, maintain, and monitor an integrated database

Public Health Relevance

The Administration Core ensures that goals of the Adult Children Study (ACS) are met, including identifying the earliest brain changes of AD, determining the evolution of these changes overtime, and assessing their predictive power for the eventual development of symptomatic AD. With the assistance of an External Advisory Committee and an Executive Committee including the leaders of the Projects and Cores, the Administration Core supports, monitors, and coordinates the activities of all components of the ACS.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Type
Research Program Projects (P01)
Project #
5P01AG026276-09
Application #
8732589
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAG1-ZIJ-4)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2014-06-01
Budget End
2015-05-31
Support Year
9
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$174,951
Indirect Cost
$59,853
Name
Washington University
Department
Type
DUNS #
068552207
City
Saint Louis
State
MO
Country
United States
Zip Code
63130
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