The Administrative Core will coordinate the activities of the three Projects and three Cores of this Program Project.
The Specific Aims of the Administrative Core are: 1) to provide administrative assistance and fiscal oversight to all Projects and Cores B and C;2) to facilitate communication both within the Program and between the Program members and other investigators, centers, programs and institutions;and 3) to establish and maintain an Executive Committee, an external Scientific Advisory Committee, and an Internal Advisory Committee. The services offered by the Core will include administrative and secretarial support (ordering of supplies, financial reports, assistance with budget management), organization of regular meetings and of the annual meeting with the Scientific Advisory Committee, and preparation of progress reports and other documents. The Director will oversee and coordinate all activities of the Core. He will meet regularly with the Administrator and with other Project Leaders/Core Directors to discuss administrative and managerial issues to insure that the Program is working effectively and efficiently. The Administrator and the Administrative Assistant will assist the investigators with financial matters, the organization of meetings and conferences, and general needs for the proper functioning of the Program.

Public Health Relevance

This Program Project will investigate basic mechanisms of aging of tissues, focusing on the stem cells in those tissues. This research holds promise for discovering mechanisms to help aged tissues heal more effectively by enhancing the ability of the stem cells to participate in tissue repair and regeneration. This Administrative Core will provide much needed support for the progress of the research of this Program.

National Institute of Health (NIH)
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Research Program Projects (P01)
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Special Emphasis Panel (ZAG1-ZIJ-2)
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Stanford University
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