Understanding the regulatory networks that control adult stem cell homeostasis during aging is a critical step in discovering ways to preserve the function of different tissues throughout lifespan. Ultra-high-Throughput sequencing approaches will allow the unbiased genome-wide identification of transcriptional regulator binding sites and histone modification patterns in aging stem cells. This knowledge will be pivotal to decipher the molecular mechanisms that maintain stem cell reservoirs in adult organisms. The mission of the Genomics and Ultra-High-Throughput Sequencing Core will be: 1. To generate consistent data for transcription factor binding sites, epigenetic modifications on chromatin, and RNA transcripts that can be shared between the three laboratories of the Program Project; 2. To provide computational and statistical support for data analysis and to develop new bioinformatic approaches for the combined analysis of datasets from different stem cell types at different ages; 3. To establish and maintain a data management system that will facilitate data exchange between the participating laboratories.

Public Health Relevance

The unbiased identification of age-dependent changes in transcriptional and epigenetic networks in adult stem cells will be pivotal for determining the mechanisms underlying the regulation of these cells throughout life, and will help uncover new avenues to counteract age-dependent decline in tissue regeneration.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Type
Research Program Projects (P01)
Project #
5P01AG036695-04
Application #
8683047
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAG1-ZIJ-2)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2014-07-01
Budget End
2015-06-30
Support Year
4
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$178,518
Indirect Cost
$84,510
Name
Stanford University
Department
Type
DUNS #
009214214
City
Stanford
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
94305
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