The administrative core of this PPG, led by Dr. Kenneth Bayles, will provide the organizational structure for the entire program project and will give leadership, oversight, and direction for the individual projects and cores. The first specific aim of this core, to set and implement the programmatic goals for the PPG, will be achieved through regular interactions with each of the participants in this PPG to monitor the progress and reinforce the specific aims of each project.
The second aim will be to assure that the participants of this PPG are communicating effectively by organizing regular meetings to promote the exchange of ideas and to ensure that off-campus participants are fully integrated into this project. Developing the scientific program will be the third aim focusing primarily on pursuing additional funding opportunities that will complement and foster the continued growth of our program.
The fourth aim will be to maintain a system for fiscal accountability and resource allocation, ensuring that all budgetary issues related to this PPG are handled appropriately by trained personnel who are experienced with NIH and UNMC policies related to grants administration. The fifth and final aim will be to offer statistical support for all projects in the planning of experiments and interpretation of results. This support will be coordinated by Dr. Fang Yu in the Department of Biostatistics at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, who will participate in regular meetings with the members of this PPG. The successful implementation of these specific aims will form a solid foundation of administrative support needed by each of the scientific projects in this PPG and will help to assure the continued success of our program.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Type
Research Program Projects (P01)
Project #
2P01AI083211-06
Application #
8742802
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAI1)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2014-07-01
Budget End
2015-06-30
Support Year
6
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
University of Nebraska Medical Center
Department
Type
DUNS #
City
Omaha
State
NE
Country
United States
Zip Code
68198
Moormeier, Derek E; Bayles, Kenneth W (2017) Staphylococcus aureus biofilm: a complex developmental organism. Mol Microbiol 104:365-376
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Gries, Casey M; Kielian, Tammy (2017) Staphylococcal Biofilms and Immune Polarization During Prosthetic Joint Infection. J Am Acad Orthop Surg 25 Suppl 1:S20-S24
Markley, John L; Br├╝schweiler, Rafael; Edison, Arthur S et al. (2017) The future of NMR-based metabolomics. Curr Opin Biotechnol 43:34-40
Mashruwala, Ameya A; Gries, Casey M; Scherr, Tyler D et al. (2017) SaeRS Is Responsive to Cellular Respiratory Status and Regulates Fermentative Biofilm Formation in Staphylococcus aureus. Infect Immun 85:
Paharik, Alexandra E; Kotasinska, Marta; Both, Anna et al. (2017) The metalloprotease SepA governs processing of accumulation-associated protein and shapes intercellular adhesive surface properties in Staphylococcus epidermidis. Mol Microbiol 103:860-874
Krute, Christina N; Rice, Kelly C; Bose, Jeffrey L (2017) VfrB Is a Key Activator of the Staphylococcus aureus SaeRS Two-Component System. J Bacteriol 199:
Zhang, Xinyan; Bayles, Kenneth W; Luca, Sorin (2017) Staphylococcus aureus CidC Is a Pyruvate:Menaquinone Oxidoreductase. Biochemistry 56:4819-4829
Halsey, Cortney R; Lei, Shulei; Wax, Jacqueline K et al. (2017) Amino Acid Catabolism in Staphylococcus aureus and the Function of Carbon Catabolite Repression. MBio 8:
Mishra, Surabhi; Horswill, Alexander R (2017) Heparin Mimics Extracellular DNA in Binding to Cell Surface-Localized Proteins and Promoting Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation. mSphere 2:

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