The Stanford CAM Center for Chronic Low Back Pain has the goal of characterizing the neural mechanisms of four CAM therapies (mindfulness-based stress reduction, cognitive behavioral therapy, real-time fMRI neurofeedback and acupuncture) and translating these mechanisms into tailored and effective treatments for chronic low back pain (CLBP). The Neuroimaging Core will function synergistically with the Behavioral and Psychophysics Core to provide the critical infrastructure and common methodology needed to characterize neural mechanisms across the Center's Projects. To facilitate the research goals of the Center, the Core will aim to: 1. Provide shared neuroimaging resources for the Center's Projects;2. Provide a common neuroimaging research protocol that can address neuroimaging research questions within and between the Center's Projects;and 3. Serve as a consulting resource for neuroimaging objectives of specific projects.

Public Health Relevance

Advanced neuroimaging tools are needed to investigate how CAM therapies work for chronic low back pain and how to optimize efficacy. The Neuroimaging Core will play a critical role in providing the resources needed to achieve this overall Center goal.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine (NCCAM)
Type
Research Program Projects (P01)
Project #
5P01AT006651-03
Application #
8496512
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAT1-SM)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-06-01
Budget End
2014-05-31
Support Year
3
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$400,614
Indirect Cost
$100,484
Name
Stanford University
Department
Type
DUNS #
009214214
City
Stanford
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
94305
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