Dr. Correa will work with a very experienced administrative person at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Mrs. Ruby Welch efficiently manages the financial aspects of the POl, including coordination with the Colombian teams at Universidad del Valle and Accion Fiduciaria. GI Administrative personnel will make the travel arrangements for the investigators and the Advisory Committees. Dr. Correa also works closely with Dr. Robertino Mera, M.D., Ph.D. in Biostatistics. Dr. Mera is the main person responsible for the statistical design and analyses of the data generated by all investigators in the three projects. Dr. Mera visited the Colombian component of the Program Project, designed and monitored the data gathering and editing and has been largely responsible for the statistical analysis in the past. Additionally, statisticians from the Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center under the direction of Dr. Yu Shyr will advise and participate actively with the local investigators in the statistical aspects of the projects.

Public Health Relevance

The investigators will be working with Vanderbilt personnel to make all the necessary administrative arrangements needed for the conduct ofthe investigation.

National Institute of Health (NIH)
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Research Program Projects (P01)
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Special Emphasis Panel (ZCA1-GRB-P)
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Vanderbilt University Medical Center
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