Young adulthood is an important period in the development of regular cigarette smoking and nicotine dependence. Dramatic increases in both the prevalence and intensity of smoking occur after age 18. National data show that the prevalence of cigarette smoking is higher among young adults (aged 18-24) than among any other age group, and there is little evidence of a decline in these rates over the past several years. The primary goal of this proposed project is to continue to follow our established cohort of high risk adolescents through the period of young adulthood (approximately ages 19-25 for our cohort), with four annual assessments, and to examine the contributions of social and emotional contextual factors to the development of smoking patterns as they emerge from adolescence through young adulthood. We will examine how changes in social contexts (friendship networks, life transitions) may serve as markers for smoking change, and how specific behavioral risk factors (e.g., alcohol and substance use, depression, ADHD symptoms) may confer additional risk in developing nicotine dependence. In addition, we propose to examine, more in-depth, the phenomenon of nicotine dependence across the range of smoking levels, from light and infrequent smokers to more regular and "heavier" smokers, and how nicotine dependence is best assessed and conceptualized at different levels of smoking. This project will take advantage ofthe wealth of rich, longitudinal data already collected on this sample, with a unique opportunity to look specifically at mechanisms that might explain vulnerability to smoking progression and the development of dependence. We will be able to track changes in key variables and smoking from adolescence through young adulthood, and examine how both protective and risk vulnerabilities present during adolescence and emerging adulthood may play a role in predicting changes in smoking behavior. Understanding factors that influence the development of smoking patterns (both escalation and cessation) during the vulnerable period of adolescence to young adulthood is of critical importance for developing future interventions.

Public Health Relevance

Although cigarette smoking typically starts in adolescence, the transition to young adulthood (ages 18-24) brings with it more entrenched patterns of smoking and nicotine dependence. The primary goal of this project is to continue to follow an established cohort of high risk adolescents through the period of young adulthood and to examine the contributions of social and emotional contextual factors to the development of smoking patterns as they emerge from adolescence through young adulthood. Understanding factors that influence the development of smoking patterns (both escalation and cessation) during the vulnerable period of adolescence to young adulthood is of critical importance for developing future interventions.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Research Program Projects (P01)
Project #
5P01CA098262-10
Application #
8734234
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZCA1-RPRB-7)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2014-08-01
Budget End
2015-07-31
Support Year
10
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$246,829
Indirect Cost
$73,275
Name
University of Illinois at Chicago
Department
Type
DUNS #
098987217
City
Chicago
State
IL
Country
United States
Zip Code
60612
Dierker, Lisa; Rose, Jennifer; Selya, Arielle et al. (2015) Depression and nicotine dependence from adolescence to young adulthood. Addict Behav 41:124-8
Nadell, Melanie J; Mermelstein, Robin J; Hedeker, Donald et al. (2015) Work and Non-Work Physical Activity Predict Real-Time Smoking Level and Urges in Young Adults. Nicotine Tob Res 17:803-9
Hedeker, Donald (2015) Methods for Multilevel Ordinal Data in Prevention Research. Prev Sci 16:997-1006
Coon, Hilary; Piasecki, Thomas M; Cook, Edwin H et al. (2014) Association of the CHRNA4 neuronal nicotinic receptor subunit gene with frequency of binge drinking in young adults. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 38:930-7
Pugach, Oksana; Hedeker, Donald; Mermelstein, Robin (2014) A Bivariate Mixed-Effects Location-Scale Model with application to Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) data. Health Serv Outcomes Res Methodol 14:194-212
Pugach, Oksana; Hedeker, Donald; Richmond, Melanie J et al. (2014) Modeling mood variation and covariation among adolescent smokers: application of a bivariate location-scale mixed-effects model. Nicotine Tob Res 16 Suppl 2:S151-8
Cannon, Dale S; Mermelstein, Robin J; Hedeker, Donald et al. (2014) Effect of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor genes (CHRN) on longitudinal cigarettes per day in adolescents and young adults. Nicotine Tob Res 16:137-44
Mermelstein, Robin J (2014) Adapting to a changing tobacco landscape: research implications for understanding and reducing youth tobacco use. Am J Prev Med 47:S87-9
Piasecki, Thomas M; Trela, Constantine J; Hedeker, Donald et al. (2014) Smoking antecedents: separating between- and within-person effects of tobacco dependence in a multiwave ecological momentary assessment investigation of adolescent smoking. Nicotine Tob Res 16 Suppl 2:S119-26
Sokolovsky, Alexander W; Mermelstein, Robin J; Hedeker, Donald (2014) Factors predicting compliance to ecological momentary assessment among adolescent smokers. Nicotine Tob Res 16:351-8

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