The Scientific/Administrative Leadership Core provides the scientific, managerial, and coordinating structure to ensure the efficient and effective functioning of the program project. The Scientific/Administrative Core includes experienced research administrators, a set of external scientific advisors, and an Executive Steering Committee that provides scientific integration, quality control, and oversight across projects and cores.
Our specific aims fall under three broad domains: scientific leadership, mentoring, and administration. Our scientific leadership aims include: 1) providing overall scientific leadership to the program project;2) providing an intellectual environment that will generate a collaborative program of multidisciplinary research to address important issues about adolescent and young adult tobacco use, including helping to plan overlapping analyses across projects;3) providing support for and coordination of the research activities across projects and cores;4) maintaining policies and procedures for the program project (e.g., publication and presentation policies, authorship and collaborative policies);and 5) coordinating and promoting dissemination of research findings. Our mentoring aim includes providing mentoring and career development opportunities (e.g., peer review publication authorship, national meeting presentations, dissertation projects) for graduate students, post-doctoral fellows and junior faculty. Our administrative aims include: 1) providing overall administrative leadership and support for the program project;2) maintaining financial oversight of the entire program project;and 3) coordinating all networking between projects, cores, and Institutions to ensure efficient operations and timely communications, including the maintenance of communication vehicles and structures (e.g., password protected web sites for sharing of documents, information across projects, cores, and institutions). Thus, this core plays an essential role in this program project by serving as the coordinating center of the group of investigators and integrating all activities and scientific findings. This type of integration is likely to lead to greater progress in the field.

Public Health Relevance

Researchers have increasingly recognized that we need an integrated, multidisciplinary team approach to understanding and treating tobacco use and dependence in order to accelerate the pace of science and public health efforts in this area. Thus, coordination among multiple investigators, each with his or her own areas of expertise, and active facilitation are needed in order to make progress in reducing rates of adolescent and young adult smoking. This core plays an essential role in this program project by serving as the coordinating center of the group of investigators and integrating all activities and scientific findings. This type of integration is likely to lead to greater progress in the field.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Research Program Projects (P01)
Project #
5P01CA098262-10
Application #
8734239
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZCA1-RPRB-7)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2014-08-01
Budget End
2015-07-31
Support Year
10
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$355,314
Indirect Cost
$73,274
Name
University of Illinois at Chicago
Department
Type
DUNS #
098987217
City
Chicago
State
IL
Country
United States
Zip Code
60612
Cannon, Dale S; Mermelstein, Robin J; Medina, Tait R et al. (2016) CYP2A6 Effects on Subjective Reactions to Initial Smoking Attempt. Nicotine Tob Res 18:637-41
Dierker, Lisa; Selya, Arielle; Rose, Jennifer et al. (2016) Nicotine Dependence and Alcohol Problems from Adolescence to Young Adulthood. Dual Diagn (Foster City) 1:
Crane, Natania A; Gorka, Stephanie M; Giedgowd, Grace E et al. (2016) Adolescent's respiratory sinus arrhythmia is associated with smoking rate five years later. Biol Psychol 118:107-13
Pugach, Oksana; Cannon, Dale S; Weiss, Robert B et al. (2016) Classification Tree Analysis as a Method for Uncovering Relations Between CHRNA5A3B4 and CHRNB3A6 in Predicting Smoking Progression in Adolescent Smokers. Nicotine Tob Res :
Hertel, Andrew W; Mermelstein, Robin J (2016) Smoker identity development among adolescents who smoke. Psychol Addict Behav 30:475-83
Piasecki, Thomas M; Hedeker, Donald; Dierker, Lisa C et al. (2016) Progression of nicotine dependence, mood level, and mood variability in adolescent smokers. Psychol Addict Behav 30:484-93
Cannon, Dale S; Medina, Tait R; Mermelstein, Robin J et al. (2016) CYP2A6 Longitudinal Effects in Young Smokers. Nicotine Tob Res 18:196-203
Hedeker, Donald; Mermelstein, Robin J; Demirtas, Hakan et al. (2016) A Mixed-effects Location-Scale Model for Ordinal Questionnaire Data. Health Serv Outcomes Res Methodol 16:117-131
Gao, Weihua; Hedeker, Donald; Mermelstein, Robin et al. (2016) A scalable approach to measuring the impact of nonignorable nonresponse with an EMA application. Stat Med 35:5579-5602
Schuster, Randi Melissa; Mermelstein, Robin J; Hedeker, Donald (2016) Ecological momentary assessment of working memory under conditions of simultaneous marijuana and tobacco use. Addiction 111:1466-76

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