Core D - Phyllis Gimotty The Biostatistics Core consists of personnel with biostatistical experience. The goals of the Biostatistics Core are to provide biostatistical expertise to program project investigators, and through collaboration use statistical models and other statistical techniques to understand the critical abnormalities in signaling molecules, pathways, and networks that are pathogenetic in melanoma and that have therapeutic relevance. The Biostatistics Core faculty and staff have previous experience in melanoma research and extensive experience with the proposed statistical methodologies and their application to the research studies proposed in this program project. They will provide expertise in the following areas to support its research objectives: (1) statistical methods to study associations among gene-related factors and/or among associated protein-related factors, as well as factors that influence tumor growth in different biological models;(2) statistical design and evaluation strategies to assess the impact of experimental interventions in genes on relevant biological outcomes (cell apoptosis, tumor growth and development, therapeutic response);and (3) statistical decision making tools to make scientifically valid statements related to key scientific hypotheses. The Biostatistics Core members will collaborate with project investigators to interpret and synthesize study findings, and collaborate on the preparation of manuscripts. These collaborations will insure that the projects proposed will have high quality study designs and statistical analysis plans that will provide a solid foundation for statistical models and inferences related to signaling pathways in melanoma.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Research Program Projects (P01)
Project #
5P01CA114046-05
Application #
8378458
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZCA1-GRB-P)
Project Start
Project End
2013-08-31
Budget Start
2012-05-01
Budget End
2013-04-30
Support Year
5
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$176,524
Indirect Cost
$102,121
Name
Wistar Institute
Department
Type
DUNS #
075524595
City
Philadelphia
State
PA
Country
United States
Zip Code
19104
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