The Administrative Core will perform three principal roles. First, it will provide an administrattive framework for the Program. This will involve clerical and logistical support for the Projects and Cores in addition to providing financial oversight. The Core will coordinate activities within the Program including the seminar series, journal clubs, the annual scientific retreat, visits by members of advisory boards and collaborating scientists. A scientific advisory board will oversee the scientific activities of the Program, including the management of the Pilot Project and Training Programs. The Core will asist, where possible, the Executive Comittee, composed of the Program and Core Directors. This committee will work with the Program's Director, Dr. Stephen Dalton, to manage overall activities, to make decisions regarding the Pilot Project and Training programs and, to evaluate the overall direction and goals of the Program. Dr. Dalton will work closely with the Core's Administrative Manager to ensure that the Program is coordinated and functions efficiently. A second role of the Core, will be to administer the Pilot Project Program which will consist of three projects, to be funded annually with awards of $45,000/project. The Core will solicit applications from investigators in the Southeast region with an objective to stimulate innovative hESC research in the region. The Program is targeted towards new investigtaors to the field. The Administrative Core will manage the selection and administration of the Pilot Projects and will coordinate activities between awardees and other components of the Program. A third role for the Core will be to manage and promote interactions between the Program and the Southeastern hESC community, including technology and reagent transfer, collaborative initiatives. The Core will establish mechanisms to promote interactions with the Southeastern scientific community including web-based resources.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)
Type
Research Program Projects (P01)
Project #
5P01GM085354-05
Application #
8382727
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZGM1-GDB-8)
Project Start
2012-08-01
Project End
2014-07-31
Budget Start
2012-08-01
Budget End
2013-07-31
Support Year
5
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$246,015
Indirect Cost
$79,224
Name
University of Georgia
Department
Type
DUNS #
004315578
City
Athens
State
GA
Country
United States
Zip Code
30602
Boward, Ben; Wu, Tianming; Dalton, Stephen (2016) Concise Review: Control of Cell Fate Through Cell Cycle and Pluripotency Networks. Stem Cells 34:1427-36
Foti, Rossana; Gnan, Stefano; Cornacchia, Daniela et al. (2016) Nuclear Architecture Organized by Rif1 Underpins the Replication-Timing Program. Mol Cell 61:260-73
Li, Ben; Sun, Zhaonan; He, Qing et al. (2016) Bayesian inference with historical data-based informative priors improves detection of differentially expressed genes. Bioinformatics 32:682-9
Rivera-Mulia, Juan Carlos; Gilbert, David M (2016) Replication timing and transcriptional control: beyond cause and effect-part III. Curr Opin Cell Biol 40:168-78
Avery, John; Dalton, Stephen (2016) Methods for Derivation of Multipotent Neural Crest Cells Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells. Methods Mol Biol 1341:197-208
Rivera-Mulia, Juan Carlos; Gilbert, David M (2016) Replicating Large Genomes: Divide and Conquer. Mol Cell 62:756-65
Wilson, Korey A; Elefanty, Andrew G; Stanley, Edouard G et al. (2016) Spatio-temporal re-organization of replication foci accompanies replication domain consolidation during human pluripotent stem cell lineage specification. Cell Cycle 15:2464-75
Singh, Amar M; Trost, Robert; Boward, Benjamin et al. (2016) Utilizing FUCCI reporters to understand pluripotent stem cell biology. Methods 101:4-10
Berger, Ryan P; Sun, Yu Hua; Kulik, Michael et al. (2016) ST8SIA4-Dependent Polysialylation is Part of a Developmental Program Required for Germ Layer Formation from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells. Stem Cells 34:1742-52
Soufi, Abdenour; Dalton, Stephen (2016) Cycling through developmental decisions: how cell cycle dynamics control pluripotency, differentiation and reprogramming. Development 143:4301-4311

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