The Administration Core will have the primary responsibility for Program management and coordination. While the individual components of our Program can function independently in many respects, success during the next five years depends to a substantial degree on effective interactions among investigators at four major research institutions. Therefore, there will be constant needs to maintain open lines of communication, and to ensure that daily operations are carried out both efficiently and effectively. Thus, the Principal Investigator(s) of each component of our Program also will devote time and effort to program management and central coordination within the Administration Core. This will encourage our individual projects to continue to function as parts of a highly integrated whole. In addition, because our Aging Research Program has expanded to include other NIH funded projects as outlined in the introduction of this application, an aim of this Core will be to maintain collaborative relationships with these other efforts. These overall goals will be accomplished through: (a) management and coordination of program activities;(b) oversight of administrative requirements (e.g., coordination of IRB review and procedures for obtaining informed consents);(c) provision of statistical consultation to program investigators;(d) tracking of adverse events and developing necessary reports to oversight groups (e.g., IRBs at cooperating institutions, NIH), and (e) stimulation of productivity and dissemination of findings. An Advisory Committee will also be formed to review activities and progress and ensure that this program continues: (a) to meet its aims successfully, and (b) to retain its leadership role within this rapidly evolving field. The Committee will meet annually, and members will be available as needed should needs arise for additional advice.

National Institute of Health (NIH)
Research Program Projects (P01)
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Special Emphasis Panel (ZHD1)
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Hugo W. Moser Research Institute Kennedy Krieger
United States
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