Core B has three goals: to recruit participants for each of the three projects;to collect data for each of the three projects;and to transcribe and code the speech and gesture data gathered in Projects I, II, and III. In the previous two grant periods. Core B has provided all research projects with recruitment, data collection and transcription of speech and gesture and will continue to provide these services to all projects during the proposed period. Centralizing recruitment and data collection for the three projects in a single core increases efficiency across the entire project and creates the uniformity necessary for data sharing and constructing compatible databases. Projects I and II share the same methodology, with Project I testing its pool of 55 typically-developing children and Project II using the same protocol on its pool of 35 children with unilateral brain injury. In addition. Project III will recruit 53 children, 43 from Projects I and II, to conduct assessments of brain organization. Centralizing transcription and coding of speech and gesture for Projects I and II will increase efficiency and will ensure that the data can be analyzed across projects. Lindsey Richland, Core B leader, will work with the three research project leaders to ensure that Core services support the needs of the research projects.

Public Health Relevance

Core B provides centralized data collection, transcription and coding for the research projects I, II and III. The program project is designed to explore the impact of environmental and biological variation on how children learn to use their language for higher order thinking, a key cognitive underpinning of academic and 21st century career success

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD)
Type
Research Program Projects (P01)
Project #
2P01HD040605-11A1
Application #
8609837
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZHD1-DSR-H (GS))
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-12-10
Budget End
2014-11-30
Support Year
11
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$276,483
Indirect Cost
$101,494
Name
University of Chicago
Department
Type
DUNS #
005421136
City
Chicago
State
IL
Country
United States
Zip Code
60637
Demir, Özlem Ece; Levine, Susan C; Goldin-Meadow, Susan (2015) A tale of two hands: children's early gesture use in narrative production predicts later narrative structure in speech. J Child Lang 42:662-81
Tune, Sarah; Schlesewsky, Matthias; Small, Steven L et al. (2014) Cross-linguistic variation in the neurophysiological response to semantic processing: evidence from anomalies at the borderline of awareness. Neuropsychologia 56:147-66
Ozçal??kan, Seyda; Gentner, Dedre; Goldin-Meadow, Susan (2014) Do iconic gestures pave the way for children's early verbs? Appl Psycholinguist 35:1143-1162
Goldin-Meadow, Susan (2014) Widening the lens: what the manual modality reveals about language, learning and cognition. Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 369:20130295
Demir, Ozlem Ece; Fisher, Joan A; Goldin-Meadow, Susan et al. (2014) Narrative processing in typically developing children and children with early unilateral brain injury: seeing gesture matters. Dev Psychol 50:815-28
Goldin-Meadow, Susan; Levine, Susan C; Hedges, Larry V et al. (2014) New evidence about language and cognitive development based on a longitudinal study: hypotheses for intervention. Am Psychol 69:588-99
Goldin-Meadow, Susan (2014) In search of resilient and fragile properties of language. J Child Lang 41 Suppl 1:64-77
Cartmill, Erica A; Hunsicker, Dea; Goldin-Meadow, Susan (2014) Pointing and naming are not redundant: children use gesture to modify nouns before they modify nouns in speech. Dev Psychol 50:1660-6
Carlson, Matthew T; Sonderegger, Morgan; Bane, Max (2014) How children explore the phonological network in child-directed speech: A survival analysis of children's first word productions. J Mem Lang 75:159-180
Dick, Anthony Steven; Raja Beharelle, Anjali; Solodkin, Ana et al. (2013) Interhemispheric functional connectivity following prenatal or perinatal brain injury predicts receptive language outcome. J Neurosci 33:5612-25

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