Six complementary and collaborative projects are proposed, with a common scientific and administrative core, to elucidate the nature and emergence of cognitive competence as it is manifest across human and nonhuman primate species, across developmental periods, and across different groups (e.g., individuals with ADHD). The present application benefits from substantial collegiality between investigators and convergence between the projects, so that the scientific promise of the entire program greatly exceeds the sum of the anticipated scientific gains of each strong individual project. The psychological processes being investigated (learning, memory, attention, executive function, categorization, language, and self regulation) are themselves closely inter-related, such that understanding of any one process dictates studying its relation to the other constructs using behavioral, cognitive, comparative, developmental, and neuroscientific paradigms. The application reflects a wide range of converging measures, including task performance, brain imaging, genetic analyses, and psychophysiology. The goal of these projects is to build on the current state of knowledge, including the recent findings from our own research, and to inform and be informed by theories regarding behavior and its interaction with experience and biology.

Public Health Relevance

The findings of these projects will advance our understanding of cognition and its disorders, generating educational interventions and clinical applications with relevance to a wide range of mental health issues.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD)
Type
Research Program Projects (P01)
Project #
5P01HD060563-03
Application #
8305604
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZHD1-DSR-H (WD))
Program Officer
Freund, Lisa S
Project Start
2010-09-15
Project End
2015-08-31
Budget Start
2012-09-01
Budget End
2013-08-31
Support Year
3
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$819,028
Indirect Cost
$171,062
Name
Georgia State University
Department
Miscellaneous
Type
Schools of Arts and Sciences
DUNS #
837322494
City
Atlanta
State
GA
Country
United States
Zip Code
30302
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Beran, Michael J; Rossettie, Mattea S; Parrish, Audrey E (2016) Trading up: chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) show self-control through their exchange behavior. Anim Cogn 19:109-21
Beran, Michael J (2016) "Zeroing" in on mathematics in the monkey brain. Learn Behav 44:4-6
Beran, Michael J; Parrish, Audrey E (2016) Capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) treat small and large numbers of items similarly during a relative quantity judgment task. Psychon Bull Rev 23:1206-13

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