Migration alters opportunities, resources, and relationships, but we don?t fully understand the role of migration on children. This study responds to the call for more investigation of migration in the life course to help inform policy directed at human rights, including protections for children. Developing greater understanding of socialization and identifying practices that are associated with lower adjustment problems and better social competence will help inform prevention and intervention work aimed at reducing adjustment problems and providing emotional and social support to family members left behind. Because most studies of ?left behind? children rely on cross-sectional data in one sending community, there is little generalizable information about children?s socio-emotional development and how the dynamics of familial migration influence this developmental domain. This shortcoming is problematic given the implications for children?s long-term outcomes in multiple spheres including health and education. This project focuses on how differences at child, family, and community levels alter relations between migration and children?s socio-emotional development. The analyses focus on children?s socio-emotional outcomes in three contexts, and test hypotheses about the association between familial migration and children?s socio-emotional development

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD)
Type
Research Program Projects (P01)
Project #
1P01HD080659-01A1
Application #
8933922
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZHD1-DSR-W (GJ))
Project Start
Project End
2016-06-30
Budget Start
2015-07-31
Budget End
2016-06-30
Support Year
1
Fiscal Year
2015
Total Cost
$112,346
Indirect Cost
$39,630
Name
Arizona State University-Tempe Campus
Department
Type
DUNS #
943360412
City
Tempe
State
AZ
Country
United States
Zip Code
85287