investigators, and her standing in the microscopy community at UCSF make her an exceptional asset to the Program Project. She will be responsible for the day-to-day operations of the Core Facility. FUNCTIONS OF THE MICROSCOPY AND IMAGE ANALYSIS CORE The Core Microscopy Laboratory allows investigators in the Program Project to carry out histological and cytological studies of optimal quality. The Core facility provides several different important functions that have been essential to the operation of the Program Project. These include the following. 1) It provides professional and technical staff capable of high quality, sophisticated microscopic, photographic, and computer graphic techniques. The staff collaborates with investigators from each of the projects in designing experiments and provides the technical expertise to perform the microscopic techniques and assist in the interpretation of the results. 2) The Core provides the equipment, darkroom, photographic supplies, image analysis and graphics software for doing a full range of morphological studies and ensures that these supplies are available and that the equipment is well maintained. This is a key function of the staff because much of the equipment is complex and expensive, may be easily damaged, or may render suboptimal

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Type
Research Program Projects (P01)
Project #
5P01HL024075-33
Application #
8463931
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZHL1-PPG-S)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-01-01
Budget End
2013-12-31
Support Year
33
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$222,222
Indirect Cost
$78,388
Name
University of California San Francisco
Department
Type
DUNS #
094878337
City
San Francisco
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
94143
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