Core A, The Administrative Core, will provide administrative support to the PI, as well as to the Project Leaders and other Core Directors. The Core serves and will continue to serve as a focal point for manuscript and figure preparation, organizing papenA/ork for abstracts that are submitted to national and international meetings as well as the numerous, local symposia, and scheduling of travel for all Program Project Grant personnel. It also organizes the educational and compliance seminars mandated both by the Federal government and by the Hospital and provides administrative support for satisfying all compliance requirements for both the Cores and Projects. The Core schedules the formalized weekly seminars and monthly meetings of the Group and distributes the agenda for those meetings. The Core schedules the meetings with the External and Internal Advisory Committees as well. Finally, the Core will continue to serve as the liaison point for interactions with the appropriate offices at the NHLBI. All records, academic, personnel, data and financial, needed by the Program's Director are kept in the central office so that timely Progress Reports can be prepared and the finances ofthe grant closely watched. The Core tracks finances in real time so that Program Project Grant participants can continuously monitor their spending. It also keeps a central datiabase of breeding for the various mouse colonies in order to ensure that an overall accurate census is maintained.

Public Health Relevance

This Core serves as'the administrative center for the Program Project Grant.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Type
Research Program Projects (P01)
Project #
5P01HL069779-12
Application #
8729000
Study Section
Heart, Lung, and Blood Program Project Review Committee (HLBP)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
Budget End
Support Year
12
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
City
Cincinnati
State
OH
Country
United States
Zip Code
45229
Sandri, Marco; Robbins, Jeffrey (2014) Proteotoxicity: an underappreciated pathology in cardiac disease. J Mol Cell Cardiol 71:3-10
Molkentin, Jeffery D (2014) Letter by Molkentin regarding article, "The absence of evidence is not evidence of absence: the pitfalls of Cre Knock-Ins in the c-Kit Locus". Circ Res 115:e21-3
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Wang, Xuejun; Robbins, Jeffrey (2014) Proteasomal and lysosomal protein degradation and heart disease. J Mol Cell Cardiol 71:16-24
Gupta, Manish K; Gulick, James; Liu, Ruijie et al. (2014) Sumo E2 enzyme UBC9 is required for efficient protein quality control in cardiomyocytes. Circ Res 115:721-9
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Chakraborty, Santanu; Sengupta, Arunima; Yutzey, Katherine E (2013) Tbx20 promotes cardiomyocyte proliferation and persistence of fetal characteristics in adult mouse hearts. J Mol Cell Cardiol 62:203-13
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Razzaque, Md Abdur; Gupta, Manish; Osinska, Hanna et al. (2013) An endogenously produced fragment of cardiac myosin-binding protein C is pathogenic and can lead to heart failure. Circ Res 113:553-61

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