of Core Unit: C.1. Rationale and Objectives Each of the three laboratories involved in the Program Project will express distinct classes of proteins from serum proteins (ApoA1) and enzymes (PON1, LCAT, and MPO) to cytoplasmic ribosomal structural proteins (like L13a), enzymes (eNOS, nNOS, and Akt) and mutant forms of a subset of these in order to perform subsequent enzymatic assays as described in the Projects and analysis utilizing diverse and sophisticated instrumentation detailed in the Biophysical and Computational Chemistry Core (Core C). The principal objective of the Protein Engineering and Expression Core is to provide a centralized means for high volume protein expression thereby facilitating the relatively sophisticated and diverse biophysical studies on the proteins of interest for each Project The Core will also function as an educational facility for training members of the Program Project laboratories on ways to optimize protein expression using various strategies and also in the generation of mutants of specific alleles desired for protein expression. Training in the purification of proteins will also be provided by the Core. Centralizing these aspects of the work and training is expected to greatly enhance efficiency and productivity of the scientists participating in each project.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Type
Research Program Projects (P01)
Project #
5P01HL076491-10
Application #
8605063
Study Section
Heart, Lung, and Blood Initial Review Group (HLBP)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2014-02-01
Budget End
2015-01-31
Support Year
10
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$235,597
Indirect Cost
$80,438
Name
Cleveland Clinic Lerner
Department
Type
DUNS #
135781701
City
Cleveland
State
OH
Country
United States
Zip Code
44195
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