A.1. General Goals of the Core The primary purpose of Core C, the genomic and proteomic core (previously Core C) will be to continue providing the principle investigators with cutting edge discovery genomics and proteomics tools to assess and characterize a number of canine and murine pacing models as well as human heart biopsy samples. In essence. Core C will provide crucial experimental services that are integral to the success of each project. It is a centralized facility for the analysis, compilation and correlation of quantitative levels of mRNA, microRNA and a number of key subproteomes and proteins. The proteomics group will also provide detailed analysis of a large number of post-translational modifications (PTM), validation of genomic data using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM), new mass spectrometry (MS) -based quantitative methods along with other MS techniques. In addition, the core has an integrated cellular modeling component that will perform computational modeling to refine and further develop a working cellular model of DHF and CRT.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Type
Research Program Projects (P01)
Project #
5P01HL077180-09
Application #
8545892
Study Section
Heart, Lung, and Blood Initial Review Group (HLBP)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-07-01
Budget End
2014-06-30
Support Year
9
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$401,906
Indirect Cost
$156,841
Name
Johns Hopkins University
Department
Type
DUNS #
001910777
City
Baltimore
State
MD
Country
United States
Zip Code
21218
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