Glycosciences Skills Development is a key component of the Lung Inflammatory Disease Program of Excellence in Glycoscience (LID-PEG). Four postdoctoral fellows will be designated as Skills Development Trainees with terms of 3-4 years. At any time, one Skills Development Trainee will be associated with (and supported by) each Project. Training will consist of three components: (1) Site-specific courses in glycobiology - With the assumption that glycobiology training is often modest at the doctoral and pre-doctoral levels, Skills Development Trainees will enroll in site-specific courses in the fundamentals of glycobiology. These opportunities will include "Essentials of Glycobiology" (at UCSD for trainees at Scripps), "Advanced Topics in Glycobiology" (at University of Georgia for trainees at the CCRC) and a newly created graduate-level course on Glycobiology directed by Dr. Schnaar (for trainees at Johns Hopkins). (2) Annual Skills Development Retreats - Each year all Skills Development Trainees will travel to one of the three Program sites (in rotation) for hands-on training. This will provide specialized experiences in glycoconjugate purification, analysis, chemistry and function. In addition, it will provide opportunities for every trainee to visit and network with glycoscientists at three of the major glycobiology centers in the US. (3) Enrichment and networking opportunities. Each site provides exanded opportunities for informal glycoscience training through specialized glycobiology seminar series and local or regional glycobiology interest groups. In addition, all trainees will attend the annual Society for Glycobiology meeting, the Glycobiology Gordon Conference, or other international or specialized meetings in the glycosciences.

Public Health Relevance

Building an ongoing infrastructure capable of applying glycosciences to discovery and therapeutic development relevant to the mission of the NHLBI will require the training of the next generation of leaders in the field.

National Institute of Health (NIH)
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Research Program Projects (P01)
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Special Emphasis Panel (ZHL1-CSR-H)
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Johns Hopkins University
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