The administrative core will function as a resource to assist project and core leaders, and all personnel for administrative tasks associated with this program project. It serves a vital function to facilitate and allow investigators to focus as much attention on scientific and research activities. The core will ensure efficient and timely execution of scientific, budgetary and administrative requirements and deadlines associated with the program project. The communication and coordination of these administrative activities by the core will be paramount in reaching the objectives and goals of the program project. Goal and Objectives: The goal of Administrative Core A is to provide administrative support for all investigators participating in this translational Program Project grant. This goal will be achieved by addressing the following objectives: Objective 1: To provide administrative support for budgetary and personnel resource management. Objective 2: To provide administrative support for the coordination of scientific and review meetings. Objective: To provide administrative support for regulatory and scientific reporting of research activities.

Public Health Relevance

The administrative core will provide administrative support for all investigators participating in this translational Program Project grant. It serves a vital function to facilitate and allow investigators to focus as much attention on scientific and research activities. The core will ensure efficient and timely execution of scientific, budgetary and administrative requirements and deadlines associated with the program project.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Type
Research Program Projects (P01)
Project #
5P01HL108801-04
Application #
8702223
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZHL1)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
Budget End
Support Year
4
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
Brigham and Women's Hospital
Department
Type
DUNS #
City
Boston
State
MA
Country
United States
Zip Code
02115
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