Reducing levels of amyloid-B, the peptide that accumulates and causes Alzheimer's disease, is the most likely method to treat or prevent this disease. Our preliminary data demonstrates that postsynaptic signaling mechanisms, mainly through NMDA and orexin receptors, can dramatically reduce AB production and levels. We propose that both of these neurotransmitter systems activate substantially different signaling cascades that eventually converge on the extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway. Activation of the ERK signaling cascade rapidly and dramatically reduces AB levels in vivo. This proposal will determine the cellular pathways that link these neurotransmitter receptors to ERK and AB metabolism. Understanding these pathways will provide insight into factors that contribute to disease risk as well as provide new pathways that could be targeted for therapeutic inten/enfion to treat AD.

Public Health Relevance

Reducing levels of amyloid-B (AB), the peptide that accumulates and causes Alzheimer's disease, is the most likely method to treat or prevent this disease. Our preliminary data demonstrates that certain neurotransmitter receptors can reduce AP levels in living mice. This proposal will determine the cellular pathways that link these receptors to Ap metabolism. This could lead to new avenues for therapeutic intervention

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
Type
Research Program Projects (P01)
Project #
1P01NS074969-01A1
Application #
8331630
Study Section
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Initial Review Group (NSD)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2012-05-15
Budget End
2013-04-30
Support Year
1
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$240,513
Indirect Cost
$82,281
Name
Washington University
Department
Type
DUNS #
068552207
City
Saint Louis
State
MO
Country
United States
Zip Code
63130
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