The overarching goal of the Administrative, Career Development and Research Integration Core (Core A) of the Center for Molecular Epidemiology at Dartmouth is to promote the development of the Center as an independent, sustainable, and comprehensive resource for molecular epidemiology in New Hampshire. The Core will be the central organizing entity and a highly visible feature of the Center. It will provide a mentorship structure and intensive career development plan to ensure junior investigators'success in obtaining independent NIH funding and continued progress in their careers. The Core will supply administrative support to strategically recruit physician-scientist and basic scientists who will foster the goals and thematic areas of the Center. Included among the education and training opportunities will be an annual regional symposium on emerging topics in molecular epidemiology. The Core will facilitate integration of research compliance, regulatory and translational activities of the Center. This will include coordination of shared research resources of existing COBREs and other centers. Important aspects of the core also will include overseeing Center communications, administrative, fiscal, reporting and compliance functions and designing and executing an aggressive evaluation plan for the Center.

Public Health Relevance

The Administrative, Career Development and Research Integration Core will play a central role in supporting the goals ofthe Centerfor Molecular Epidemiology and its success as sustainable resource in New Hampshire and the scientific community at large.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Type
Exploratory Grants (P20)
Project #
5P20GM104416-02
Application #
8627620
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZGM1)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
Budget End
Support Year
2
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
Dartmouth College
Department
Type
DUNS #
City
Hanover
State
NH
Country
United States
Zip Code
03755
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