To American Indians, resilience as a response to trauma is not new. They have survived forced removal from homelands, genocide, the imposition of a reservation system, mandated boarding schools, forced adoption programs, and discriminatory practices against their cultural traditions, religions, and languages. Such prolonged exposure to negative factors has resulted in a long-term cycle of historical trauma. Brave Heart (1999) describes historical trauma response as

Public Health Relevance

Resilience has become an important concept in human development and mental health research and practice over the past two decades. In the proposed project, the experiences of individuals who display resilient adaptations will be used to identify protective factors i.e., assets such as coping skills and resources such as social support networks, and those factors can be later incorporated in the development of culturally appropriate health promotion programs that foster resilience.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD)
Type
Exploratory Grants (P20)
Project #
1P20MD006872-01
Application #
8353781
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZMD1-RN (01))
Project Start
2012-08-28
Project End
2017-02-28
Budget Start
2012-08-28
Budget End
2013-02-28
Support Year
1
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$208,095
Indirect Cost
$36,503
Name
Northern Arizona University
Department
Type
DUNS #
806345542
City
Flagstaff
State
AZ
Country
United States
Zip Code
86011