Community engagement is an essential component to the research process. A review of the history of eariier population-based studies, in both majority and minority populations, indicates that requisite to a study's success is the comprehensive involvement of the study population's community. In 1947, Framingham's founders insightfully established an Executive Committee of lay community members who would assist in the study's planning and who would identify publicity venues (Dawber, Meadors, Moore, 1951). To accommodate the unique needs ofthe Native American population, the Strong Heart Study, in its pre-exam activities, made an effort to obtain community involvement in the study's planning (Stoddard, et. al. 2000). Considerable attention was devoted to the production of print media - posters, brochures - that incorporated Native American cultural symbolism. The Coronary Risk in Young Adults study (CARDIA) included in its initial recruitment plan strategies that involved the endorsements of local community leaders and the use of local media (Hughes, Cutter, et. al;1987). The Jackson Heart Study in its formative years developed the Community Partnership Coalition. The primary purpose of this

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD)
Type
Exploratory Grants (P20)
Project #
1P20MD006899-01
Application #
8352447
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZMD1-RN (01))
Project Start
2012-06-01
Project End
2017-01-31
Budget Start
2012-06-01
Budget End
2013-01-31
Support Year
1
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$182,492
Indirect Cost
$40,585
Name
Jackson State University
Department
Type
DUNS #
044507085
City
Jackson
State
MS
Country
United States
Zip Code
39217
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