Zoonotic and emerging infectious diseases represent an increasing and very real threat to global health, and it is essential that we expand our understanding of the pathogenesis and prevention of these diseases because of the increasing density of human populations, the increased exposure to domestic animal populations, and the crowding of wildlife into limited areas with frequent human contact. To address the need for infectious disease research capabilities, a COBRE Center of Excellence was established at Montana State University (MSU), with the goal of positioning Montana as a national leader in research on the pathogenesis of zoonotic infectious diseases. Over the past four years, the Center has been extremely successful, resulting in development of infrastructure, recruitment and support of junior investigators, and formation of a cohesive Center of investigators. The synergism of these components has resulted in the establishment of a solid foundation for expansion of infectious disease research in the region. With this infrastructure in place, we are now ideally poised to expand and strengthen the Center as a scalable and sustainable research enterprise. Our long term goal is to establish a sustainable Center of Excellence that is focused on understanding pathogenesis, host immune responses, and therapeutic development for zoonotic and emerging infectious diseases of regional and worldwide importance. While the foundation for this goal has been established through accomplishments realized during COBRE I, there is still a critical need for further faculty development, infrastructure enhancement, and recruitment of additional researchers in the area of zoonotic and emerging infectious diseases, and three specific aims are proposed to address these needs. First, we propose a pipeline to foster the development of current junior investigators so that funding and infrastructure resources are available at critical junctures in their careers. Secondly, we propose to increase the size, scope, and competitiveness of the Center through four new faculty hires. Together, accomplishment of these two aims will lead to establishment of the critical mass of investigators needed to sustain the Center and support future infectious disease research initiatives. Finally, we propose to strengthen the infectious disease research infrastructure in Montana through support and enhancement of established COBRE core facilities. Because of the success of COBRE I, the proven scientific abilities of the Center investigators, the outstanding institutional support, and the emphasis on a timely and increasingly important area of research, we believe that COBRE II support will lead to completion of a scalable and sustainable Center of Excellence in zoonotic and emerging infectious disease research.

Public Health Relevance

(provided by applicant): Many of the important and emerging Infectious diseases of humans are zoonotic, and most are also potential weapons of bioterrorism. Furthermore, a number of these diseases have reservoirs in the livestock and wildlife of our nation. COBRE II will strengthen and enrich our Center of Excellence in infectious disease research, providing the resources needed to advance our understanding of disease pathogenesis and facilitating development of novel therapeutic treatments.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Center for Research Resources (NCRR)
Type
Exploratory Grants (P20)
Project #
5P20RR020185-08
Application #
8089421
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRR1-RI-B (01))
Program Officer
Canto, Maria Teresa
Project Start
2004-09-29
Project End
2014-06-30
Budget Start
2011-07-01
Budget End
2012-06-30
Support Year
8
Fiscal Year
2011
Total Cost
$2,094,341
Indirect Cost
Name
Montana State University - Bozeman
Department
Veterinary Sciences
Type
Schools of Earth Sciences/Natur
DUNS #
625447982
City
Bozeman
State
MT
Country
United States
Zip Code
59717
de Jong, Nienke W M; Ramyar, Kasra X; Guerra, Fermin E et al. (2017) Immune evasion by a staphylococcal inhibitor of myeloperoxidase. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 114:9439-9444
Guerra, Fermin E; Borgogna, Timothy R; Patel, Delisha M et al. (2017) Epic Immune Battles of History: Neutrophils vs. Staphylococcus aureus. Front Cell Infect Microbiol 7:286
Siemsen, Dan W; Dobrinen, Erin; Han, Soo et al. (2016) Vascular Dysfunction in Pneumocystis-Associated Pulmonary Hypertension Is Related to Endothelin Response and Adrenomedullin Concentration. Am J Pathol 186:259-69
Hedges, Jodi F; Robison, Amanda; Kimmel, Emily et al. (2016) Type I Interferon Counters or Promotes Coxiella burnetii Replication Dependent on Tissue. Infect Immun 84:1815-25
Guerra, Fermin E; Addison, Conrad B; de Jong, Nienke W M et al. (2016) Staphylococcus aureus SaeR/S-regulated factors reduce human neutrophil reactive oxygen species production. J Leukoc Biol 100:1005-1010
Zurek, Oliwia W; Pallister, Kyler B; Voyich, Jovanka M (2015) Staphylococcus aureus Inhibits Neutrophil-derived IL-8 to Promote Cell Death. J Infect Dis 212:934-8
Pallister, Kyler B; Mason, Sara; Nygaard, Tyler K et al. (2015) Bovine CCL28 Mediates Chemotaxis via CCR10 and Demonstrates Direct Antimicrobial Activity against Mastitis Causing Bacteria. PLoS One 10:e0138084
Hoyt, Teri R; Dobrinen, Erin; Kochetkova, Irina et al. (2015) B cells modulate systemic responses to Pneumocystis murina lung infection and protect on-demand hematopoiesis via T cell-independent innate mechanisms when type I interferon signaling is absent. Infect Immun 83:743-58
Prigge, Justin R; Hoyt, Teri R; Dobrinen, Erin et al. (2015) Type I IFNs Act upon Hematopoietic Progenitors To Protect and Maintain Hematopoiesis during Pneumocystis Lung Infection in Mice. J Immunol 195:5347-57
Heinemann, Joshua; Noon, Brigit; Mohigmi, Mohammad J et al. (2014) Real-time digitization of metabolomics patterns from a living system using mass spectrometry. J Am Soc Mass Spectrom 25:1755-62

Showing the most recent 10 out of 235 publications