This subproject is one of many research subprojects utilizing the resources provided by a Center grant funded by NIH/NCRR. Primary support for the subproject and the subproject's principal investigator may have been provided by other sources, including other NIH sources. The Total Cost listed for the subproject likely represents the estimated amount of Center infrastructure utilized by the subproject, not direct funding provided by the NCRR grant to the subproject or subproject staff. The first crucial step of mammalian embryo development after fertilization is to generate two types of cell populations, known as trophectoderm (TE) and inner cell mass (ICM). TE engages in the attachment with the mother's uterus for implantation and placenta formation, whereas ICM serves as embryonic stem cells to produce all the tissues in the fetus. Thus, both TE and ICM need to be created correctly during embryo development to achieve successful pregnancy and the growth of a healthy fetus. Genetic and environmental factors are likely to affect these processes, which may lead to various reproductive problems, such as infertility and pregnancy-related malignant cancers like choriocarcinoma and teratocarcinoma. However, how TE and ICM are created during embryo development is still not well-understood. The purpose of the project is to elucidate the genetic and molecular mechanisms that generate these two cell populations. The studies will be conducted mainly with mouse embryos as an experimental model, but the obtained information will also be assessed in human embryos. Specifically, we will test the roles of cell polarity regulators, known as Par genes, in the formation of TE and ICM. The hypothesis is that Par genes first establish polarized structures within each embryonic cell, which then serves as the spatial foundation to generate two different types of cell populations within an embryo. The study will reveal the function of Par genes in the formation of TE and ICM, and will also add to our understanding of human health issues on reproductive problems.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Center for Research Resources (NCRR)
Type
Exploratory Grants (P20)
Project #
5P20RR024206-04
Application #
8360322
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRR1-RI-2 (01))
Project Start
2011-07-01
Project End
2012-06-30
Budget Start
2011-07-01
Budget End
2012-06-30
Support Year
4
Fiscal Year
2011
Total Cost
$224,028
Indirect Cost
Name
University of Hawaii
Department
Anatomy/Cell Biology
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
965088057
City
Honolulu
State
HI
Country
United States
Zip Code
96822
Goh, William A; Zalud, Ivica (2016) Placenta accreta: diagnosis, management and the molecular biology of the morbidly adherent placenta. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med 29:1795-800
Riches, Zoe; Abanda, Ngu; Collier, Abby C (2015) BCRP protein levels do not differ regionally in adult human livers, but decline in the elderly. Chem Biol Interact 242:203-10
Collier, Abby C; Thévenon, Audrey D; Goh, William et al. (2015) Placental profiling of UGT1A enzyme expression and activity and interactions with preeclampsia at term. Eur J Drug Metab Pharmacokinet 40:471-80
Rose, Aaron H; Hoffmann, FuKun W; Hara, Jared H et al. (2015) Adjuvants may reduce in vivo transfection levels for DNA vaccination in mice leading to reduced antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Hum Vaccin Immunother 11:2305-11
Sato, Brittany L; Ward, Monika A; Astern, Joshua M et al. (2015) Validation of murine and human placental explant cultures for use in sex steroid and phase II conjugation toxicology studies. Toxicol In Vitro 29:103-12
Li, Zicong; Zeng, Fang; Meng, Fanming et al. (2014) Generation of transgenic pigs by cytoplasmic injection of piggyBac transposase-based pmGENIE-3 plasmids. Biol Reprod 90:93
Bertino, Pietro; Urschitz, Johann; Hoffmann, Fukun W et al. (2014) Vaccination with a piggyBac plasmid with transgene integration potential leads to sustained antigen expression and CD8(+) T cell responses. Vaccine 32:1670-7
Dewitt, J; Ochoa, V; Urschitz, J et al. (2014) Constitutively active TrkB confers an aggressive transformed phenotype to a neural crest-derived cell line. Oncogene 33:977-85
Comptour, Aurélie; Moretti, Charlotte; Serrentino, Maria-Elisabetta et al. (2014) SSTY proteins co-localize with the post-meiotic sex chromatin and interact with regulators of its expression. FEBS J 281:1571-84
Vernet, Nadège; Mahadevaiah, Shantha K; Yamauchi, Yasuhiro et al. (2014) Mouse Y-linked Zfy1 and Zfy2 are expressed during the male-specific interphase between meiosis I and meiosis II and promote the 2nd meiotic division. PLoS Genet 10:e1004444

Showing the most recent 10 out of 49 publications