The Administrative and Research Support Core of the Center on Advancing Decision Making In Aging (CADMA), administered by the Center for Primary Care and Outcomes Research and the Center for Health Policy, supports the program mission by pursuing the following specific alms: 1. To promote research on decision processes for behavioral, clinical, health plan and policy choices by leveraging existing resources at Stanford and collaborating Institutions, selecting and awarding funding to pilot projects, and helping Investigators to obtain additional support. 2. To develop tools and procedures that will Improve health care decision making by and for the elderly. 3. To facilitate communication and collaboration among researchers at Stanford, collaborating organizations (Including community Institutions such as the Palo Alto Medical Foundation), and other Roybal Centers, In order to move projects from pilot stage to full-scale research programs to applications that address decision making challenges. The administrative core will also have responsibility for assuring compliance with all applicable federal regulations and Stanford procedures, Including protection of human subjects and providing the highest levels of data confidentiality and privacy. 4. To disseminate the results of the research to patients, their families, their health care providers, and policymakers. In addition to publication in conventional academic channels. The research Infrastructure includes faculty drawn from multiple disciplines, extensive reference materials and data, campus-wide training coordination, affiliated local entities with expertise In CADMA research topic areas, and research staff support. In addition, CADMA will offer administrative support based within our local environment and the university. Including procedures to ensure compliance with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and other domestic and foreign regulations governing the protection of human subjects and access to data that could reveal personal information. Central to achieving the Intellectual goals of CADMA are senior faculty mentors for junior-level pilot grantees. Senior faculty will also review applications for pilot project support. On-campus seminars and retreats will facilitate local knowledge transfer, stimulate new collaborations, and raise awareness of the broad range of research conducted at Stanford that is relevant to CADMA's mission.

Public Health Relevance

The Stanford Center on Advancing Decision Making in Aging (CADMA) is dedicated to the study of decision making processes and the determinants of choices that affect health and well-being in the later years of life. CADMA seeks ultimately to develop strategies and products that will Improve the well-being of older Americans by facilitating decision making at both the Individual and policy levels.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30AG024957-10
Application #
8527650
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAG1-ZIJ-3)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-09-01
Budget End
2014-08-31
Support Year
10
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$189,728
Indirect Cost
$71,148
Name
Stanford University
Department
Type
DUNS #
009214214
City
Stanford
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
94305
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(2011) Using nudges in exercise commitment contracts. Natl Bur Econ Res Bull Aging Health :4
Bundorf, M Kate; Szrek, Helena (2010) Choice set size and decision making: the case of Medicare Part D prescription drug plans. Med Decis Making 30:582-93
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Samanez-Larkin, Gregory R; Kuhnen, Camelia M; Yoo, Daniel J et al. (2010) Variability in nucleus accumbens activity mediates age-related suboptimal financial risk taking. J Neurosci 30:1426-34
Ersner-Hershfield, Hal; Wimmer, G Elliott; Knutson, Brian (2009) Saving for the future self: neural measures of future self-continuity predict temporal discounting. Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci 4:85-92
Samanez-Larkin, Gregory R; Robertson, Elaine R; Mikels, Joseph A et al. (2009) Selective attention to emotion in the aging brain. Psychol Aging 24:519-29

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