The CFAR Immune Function Core makes available sophisticated immunologic services to CFAR researchers at all levels of expertise. The Core facilitates access to reagents, state-of-the-art instrumentation and performs complex immunological assays in response to user requests.
The specific aims of the Immune Function core are: ? To operate, maintain and provide access to a wide array of instruments needed for modern immunology including multi-color flow cytometers, plate readers, imaging, bead array reader. ? To perform a wide range of immunological assays including ELISA, ELISPOT, multi-plexed cytokine levels, western blotting, and flow cytometry in response to user requests ? To provide access to discount purchasing of reagents, kits and antibodies and access to immunologic reagents available in small test quantifies ? To provide training on instrument use and consultation about the design of immunological assays.

Public Health Relevance

Understanding of HIV immunology is important for vaccine development, disease pathogenesis and immune restoration in HIV disease. This core provides services to CFAR faculty who require access to flow cytometry and other methods for evaluating immune functions.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30AI036219-20
Application #
8641305
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAI1)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2014-05-01
Budget End
2015-04-30
Support Year
20
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
Case Western Reserve University
Department
Type
DUNS #
City
Cleveland
State
OH
Country
United States
Zip Code
44106
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