The overall goal of the Analytical Genomics and Transgenics Core (AGTC) is to enhance the productivity of the UAB Rheumatic Disease Core Center (RDCC) researchers, and provide state-of-the-art services to facilitate the development and use of appropriate genetic animal models. During the two previous funding cycles, this Core (formerly called the "Gene Targeting Core Facility" (GTCF)) served to support expertise in embryonic stem (ES) cell services as part of the UAB Transgenic Mouse Facility. In response to user needs, the Core has expanded services to more specifically assist with the creation of mouse models relevant to rheumatic disease beyond just ES services to 1) generate novel genetically engineered models of broad utility to multiple RDCC investigators, and 2) establish educational and outreach programs to forge active collaborations between the Core and RDCC investigators, especially in areas related to genomics. Formal educational resources for learning modern and emerging genetic and genomic technologies via workshops, seminars, lectures, and symposia hosted at UAB and our partner institution, Hudson Alpha Institute for Biotechnology (HAIB) are an extension of the core's evolution. The overarching objective and downstream output of the Core remains the same;to produce mouse models of human disease and of human genetic variants contributing to disease in order to provide a mammalian system to study the pathophysiology of rheumatic disease, as well as to test the efficacy of potential treatment interventions. To this end, the Analytical Genomics &Transgenic Core has the following specific aims:
AIM 1. SERVICE: To provide expert services to generate and analyze genetic/genomic data, and to develop translational animal models relating to the mission of the RDCC.
AIM 2. OUTREACH AND EDUCATION: To provide enrichment programs for RDCC investigators.
AIM 3. DEVELOPMENT: To assess RDCC investigator needs and develop new platfonns and technologies to address those needs.

Public Health Relevance

Genetically modified mouse models are critical to the understanding ofthe role of genes, identified genetic variants in humans producing disease, and ultimately creating translational models for developing novel therapeutics. The Analytical Genomics and Transgenics Core (AGTC) has been established to address these needs as they relate to the study of rheumatic disease.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30AR048311-12
Application #
8536211
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAR1-KM)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-09-01
Budget End
2014-08-31
Support Year
12
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$194,415
Indirect Cost
$59,674
Name
University of Alabama Birmingham
Department
Type
DUNS #
063690705
City
Birmingham
State
AL
Country
United States
Zip Code
35294
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