The Genomics Shared Resource (GSR), directed by Olivier Couronne, is operated jointiy by the HICCC and the Judith H. Sulzberger Columbia Genome Center, in the newly created Department of Systems Biology, chaired by Dr. Andrea Califano. The GSR occupies approximately 3,000 sq. ft on the 4th and 5th floor of the Berrie Research Building at Columbia University Medical Center. The GSR provides three highly complementary services to HICCC Investigators, Including: (a) high-quality, highly cost-effective next-generation (Nextgen) sequencing services, (b) High-Throughput Screening, High-Content Microscopy (HTS/HCM) services, and (c) access to dedicated, state-of-the-art equipment for medium-throughput biological assays. Clients and collaborators include investigators from numerous departments at Columbia University and from the HICCC, the latter constituting the majority of the GSR user base. The facility also makes its services available to investigators at other universities. For the Nextgen component, in addition to standard services such as RNA-Seq, exome, and whole-genome profiling, at a variety of coverage depths, the facility continues to develop cutting edge protocols, including single cell, stranded, low-depth highmultiplexing, and FFPE based molecular profiling assays. For the HTS/HCM component, managed by Charles Karan, Ph.D., we provide access to a variety of microfluidics and robotic platforms to perform smallmolecule, siRNA, shRNA, and cDNA library screens in cells cultures, with quantitative output profiled by a variety of readout technologies, including high-throughput/high-content microscopy. Finally, the facility provides access to several state-of-the-art technologies, such as Fluidigm Mark IV, Luminex, and Nanostring platforms for the implementation of multiplexed medium-throughput assays. The total operating budget of this co-shared facility is $2,500,000 (non including instruments purchase), of which we are requesting $34,455 from the CCSG. The HICCC has provided $645,000 in capital support for the purchase of an additional lllumina 2500 and service contract, thus justifying a 20% discount over standard user rates for its investigators.

Public Health Relevance

Availability of GSR services has been critical to the competitive application for several NCI funded centers of excellence, including the Columbia IBCP, CTD2, ISRCE, and LINCS centers. In addition, it has made it possible to provide individual investigators with the ability to rapidly generate preliminary data from molecular profile and HTS/HCM screening assays for grant filing purposes. Its tremendous growth over the last three years, from <$100K/year to >$1.5M/year is a testimony to the tremendous increase in utilization.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
2P30CA013696-40
Application #
8753131
Study Section
Subcommittee G - Education (NCI)
Project Start
1997-07-04
Project End
2019-06-30
Budget Start
2014-07-17
Budget End
2015-06-30
Support Year
40
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$49,139
Indirect Cost
$18,427
Name
Columbia University (N.Y.)
Department
Type
DUNS #
621889815
City
New York
State
NY
Country
United States
Zip Code
10032
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