CORE-015: GENOMICS SHARED RESOURCE (GSR) PROJECT SUMMARY / ABSTRACT Genomics services, with its wide range of varying technologies and complexities, are essential for cancer research. A centralized resource is needed to conduct these analyses due to the expense of the instruments and the requisite expertise. The OSUCCC Genomics Shared Resource (GSR) is a state-of-the-art laboratory that has the following Specific Aims: 1) to sequence DNA and RNA templates, using next generation sequencing platforms (i.e. Illumina MiSeq and HiSeq 2500, and Ion Torrent PGM instruments) and capillary Sanger sequencing and genotyping (using ABI 3730 DNA Analyzers); 2) to use sensitive molecular hybridization methods to detect and quantify RNA transcript expression levels and structures such as splicing and/or DNA copy numbers and variation, including digital (Nanostring) and state-of-the-art microarray (Affymetrix) platforms; and, 3) to perform polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based amplification to detect, quantify and confirm copy number variants, single nucleotide variants and small insertion/deletion polymorphisms including quantitative PCR (ABI 3730 DNA Analyzer) and by high throughput digital and custom PCR assay (QuantStudio 12K Flex and OpenArray) methods. The GSR was integrated as a single entity in 2012, bringing the prior OSUCCC MicroArray Shared Resource and Nucleic Acid Shared Resource together to enhance efficiency and facilitate user ease and choice of assays. The Director is Dr. David Symer (MBCG) and the Senior Faculty Advisor is Dr. Carlo Croce (MBCG). The GSR is located in the Biomedical Research Tower (BRT) and so is centrally located to most of the OSUCCC laboratories. Over the last grant period, the OSUCCC purchased new equipment and/or upgrades to stay on the cutting edge of genomics research, totaling $3,110,511. As a measure of the highly significant value of services provided by the GSR to OSUCCC researchers over the last grant period, the GSR provided genomics services to 175 OSUCCC members. A total of 375 publications incorporated GSR services of which 51 had a journal impact factor greater than 10. The GSR has supported 104 NCI grants, including 16 programmatic grants (i.e., N01, P50, P01, U10, U54), 57 R01s and 20 R21s. Over the next five year period, the GSR will continue to update its technological platforms and expertise in genomics methods and will continue to innovate with new assays and approaches in this very fast-paced area of research. Future plans include implementation of new methods in long-read sequencing and acquisition of robotic systems to generate reproducible high quality libraries for deep sequencing prepared from technically challenging and more limited starting materials. The GSR leverages extensive institutional support and seeks only 22.1% support from CCSG funds. The GSR is part of the Diagnostics Grouping.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30CA016058-43
Application #
9632729
Study Section
Subcommittee I - Career Development (NCI)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2018-12-01
Budget End
2019-11-30
Support Year
43
Fiscal Year
2019
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
Ohio State University
Department
Type
DUNS #
832127323
City
Columbus
State
OH
Country
United States
Zip Code
43210
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