Next Generation Sequencing and Genotyping Core Facility. The goal of the Next Gen Sequencing component is to make """"""""next generation"""""""" sequencing and related services widely available to UNC LCCC members at cost-effective prices. Services include: whole genome shotgun sequencing of human and model organisms, chromatin-IP sample sequencing, measuring RNA expression with both digital gene expression and RNA-seq, SNP typing, and polymorphism screens. The component adds value to the cancer center by putting complex and expensive DNA/RNA sequencing technology within easy reach of UNC LCCC members. Strongly integrated genomics and bioinformatics groups interact with the user to ensure robust data that is archived appropriately for future use. This component is key in UNC LCCC's participation in The Cancer Genome Atlas project and serving LCCC needs. Future plans Include expanding staff and equipment so that a full array of Next Gen sequencing and services may be provided in a timely manner, as well as the acquisition of the next generation of technology. The goal of the DNA Sequencing component is to produce high quality sequencing and genotyping data rapidly and at a reasonable cost for UNC-CH researchers using state-of-the-art technologies as well as provide technical support to enhance the value of results produced. Services include DNA sequencing and microsatellite genotyping. The component adds value to the cancer center by producing high-quality data at a competitive price while providing the benefits of a local resource to assist in: scientific strategies, sample preparation, sequencing through difficult regions, and assistance in data interpretation. This component has a wide user base with over 220 different laboratories as users in 2009. Future plans include continued use of existing equipment, reduction of chemistry costs, and evaluation of future sequencing technology options such as long read single molecule sequencing technologies. The goal of the High Throughput Genotyping component is to produce high-quality genotyping data rapidly and at a reasonable cost for researchers using state-of-the-art technologies. Services include SNP genotyping, copy number variation and DNA methylation profiling analysis. New technologies and/or applications are being explored to increase the core's competitive edge and to allow for Genome Wide Association Study on rare variants. These core components are used by multiple members and in each core, peer reviewed member used exceeds 70%. The proposed budget of $241,797 is less than 5% of the core's operating cost. The budget provides salary stability for vital core staff who work with members to adopt these novel technologies.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
2P30CA016086-35
Application #
8340327
Study Section
Subcommittee G - Education (NCI)
Project Start
2011-05-23
Project End
2015-11-30
Budget Start
2011-05-23
Budget End
2011-11-30
Support Year
35
Fiscal Year
2011
Total Cost
$274,760
Indirect Cost
Name
University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
Department
Type
DUNS #
608195277
City
Chapel Hill
State
NC
Country
United States
Zip Code
27599
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