The overarching goals of the Cancer Cell Biology Program are: (i) to understand, at the molecular and cellular levels, mechanisms underlying tumor initiation, progression, metastasis and resistance to therapeutic treatment, and (ii) to identify and validate new targets for cancer therapy. Insight derived from these studies, when integrated with research and development from other programs, will provide targets and guidance for the development of strategies for therapeutic intervention of cancer. Toward these two goals, the Program faculty investigates various aspects of cancer cell biology, including growth factors and receptors; angiogenesis and vascular biology; apoptosis; cell cycle regulation; chromatin biochemistry and transcriptional regulation; cell microstructure and function; DNA replication and repair; metabolism; regulatory RNA; and signal transduction. Led by two co-leaders with complementary expertise, Yue Xiong and James Bear, the program organizes these different areas into four major research themes: (1) Cell Cycle, (2) Cell Signaling, (3) Cell Movement and Organization, and (4) Epigenetics and Chromatin Biology. The major emphasis of the Program is to foster integrated research that spans these inter-related themes, enhancing the research and translational capabilities of program investigators through the establishment, expansion and utilization of appropriate core facilities, and promoting interactions with investigators from other LCCC basic, clinical and population sciences programs. The Cancer Cell Biology Program consists of 45 members who are associated with 7 basic science and 4 clinical departments at UNC-Chapel Hill. During the last funding period, program members have published 644 cancer-related articles (30% collaborative). In 2014, our program members held 101 grants and $27.3M (total cost) in annual extramural funding, including 24 grants and $5.8M (total costs) from the NCI.

Public Health Relevance

The Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center (LCCC) forms the nexus for researchers focused on understanding and identifying the mechanisms leading to, the prevention of, and treatments for cancer. LCCC is an integral component of the research mission at The University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill, coalescing the cancer research capabilities of the Schools of Medicine, Public Health, Pharmacy, and Nursing, and the College of Arts and Sciences. The LCCC strives to reduce cancer incidence, morbidity, and mortality in North Carolina, the United States and across the globe through innovative research, cutting-edge treatments, multi-disciplinary training, education and outreach.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30CA016086-43
Application #
9614896
Study Section
Subcommittee I - Career Development (NCI)
Program Officer
Shafik, Hasnaa
Project Start
1997-06-01
Project End
2020-11-30
Budget Start
2018-12-01
Budget End
2019-11-30
Support Year
43
Fiscal Year
2019
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
Department
Internal Medicine/Medicine
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
608195277
City
Chapel Hill
State
NC
Country
United States
Zip Code
27599
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